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Old 04-19-2010, 04:42 AM
tonic (Toni)
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hi there,

it is possible, but it relies on a cross-over which only occurs about 3% of the time with the ino and cinnamon genes....

if you cross the /ino male with the cin hen you get some males that are split for both ino and cinnamon. however as they recieved the ino on the chromosome from the male and the cinnamon on the chromosome from the hen the two genes are not onthe same chromosome, which they need to be to make a lacewing... a lacewing hen is Xino-cin/Y and a lacewing male is Xino-cin/Xino-cin.

the only way for the genes to get onto the same chromosome is for a cross-over to occur. this is when the two chromosome get tangled and end up breaking and reattaching to the opposite chromosome. this is not unusual it is how we got opaline cinnamons too. but as ino and cinnamon are found quite close together on the chromosome there is only a three percent chance of the break occurring at the right place to move the two chromosomes onto the same gene.

so, you really want to start with an ino and a cinnamon rather than a /ino so you know which the males are all /ino and cinnamon. then if an appropriate cross-over occurs you end up with a /ino-cin male that has the ino and cin on the same chromosome.

this male will produce lacewing hens.... and then you could use her also to produce lacewing males... but it is very reliant on chance and could take ages!