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Old 04-19-2010, 07:51 AM
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nev90
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I've answered this by PM but I'll post it here in case others are interested

I have bred some lacewings by combining ino and cinnamon but doing it this way you get an extremely small percentage of lacewing chicks and it takes at least 2 generations. From the first two cocks I bred that could produce lacewings I got one lacewing hen out of 31 chicks. The third cock had a lacewing in his first clutch - he will be paired to a lacewing hen soon

First you have to produce a cock bird that is split for both cinnamon & ino. Then mate this young cock to either a cinnamon or an ino hen to get female lacewings

If you paired one of your cock birds that is split for ino to the cinnamon hen half of the young males would be split for both mutations. Unfortunately you won't be able to tell which ones carry the right genes without breeding them and this would take more time

It would be better to get a cinnamon cock to mate to the ino hen or an ino cock to mate to the cinnamon hen, then all the males would be split for both mutations

Once you have a lacewing hen she can be used to produce cocks that are split for lacewing. About half the female chicks from these cocks will be lacewing

To produce male lacewings you would need to mate a lacewing hen to cock that is split for lacewing
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