Chronic Egg-laying Causes, Effects and Treatments - Talk Budgies Forums


User Menu
Forum Home
Budgie Gallery
Budgie FAQ
Site Guidelines
How-To-Guide
Members List
Today's Posts
Log In
Register now!
Search



Advanced Search
Popular Forums
Announcements

Budgie Articles

Budgie Talk

Budgie Pictures

Budgie Videos

Budgie Behavior

Determining Gender

Your Budgie's Health

Taming and Bonding

Budgie Breeding

In Memory

Other Birds

Contests

Chit Chat

Site Information

Talk Network
Talk Budgies
Talk Cockatiels
Talk Parrotlets
Talk Parrots
Sponsored Ads

Go Back   Talk Budgies Forums > Budgie Talk > Articles > Articles: Budgie Health


Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By FaeryBee
 
 
Short URL LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 12-22-2014, 10:00 AM
FaeryBee's Avatar
FaeryBee (Deborah)
Administrator



State:
 
Profile:FaeryBee is offline
Gender:
Number of Budgies: 7
Budgie Experience Level: Budgie Enthusiast
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Florida
Posts: 53,656
Gallery: 0
Karma:
Points: 2575
Rep Power: 35
FaeryBee has a reputation beyond reputeFaeryBee has a reputation beyond reputeFaeryBee has a reputation beyond reputeFaeryBee has a reputation beyond reputeFaeryBee has a reputation beyond reputeFaeryBee has a reputation beyond reputeFaeryBee has a reputation beyond reputeFaeryBee has a reputation beyond reputeFaeryBee has a reputation beyond reputeFaeryBee has a reputation beyond reputeFaeryBee has a reputation beyond repute
Default Chronic Egg-laying Causes, Effects and Treatments

Excessive or Chronic Egg-laying in Birds: Causes, Effects, and Treatment

Information Provided by:
Drs. Foster & Smith
Pet Health Care Information by Veterinarians


Excessive or Chronic Egg-laying in Birds: Causes, Effects, and Treatment

Excessive egg-laying can be a problem in multiple species of birds, but especially in cockatiels, lovebirds, and budgerigars. It occurs when a hen has a larger than normal clutch (an uninterrupted series of eggs laid by a hen, usually 2-6 eggs depending on the species) or lays repeated clutches. Hens may lay eggs even if there is no male bird present.

In the wild, egg-laying may be stimulated by the changes in photoperiod (day length), availability of food and nesting materials, increases in temperature and humidity, and other environmental conditions. In the home, these conditions may be created inadvertently with the use of artificial lighting, climate controls, and diet.

What causes excessive egg-laying?

Multiple factors may contribute to excessive egg-laying. These include:
  • Being hand-raised or imprinted on a human (from a young age the bird has viewed a human being as his mother, or one of his own species)
  • Hormonal imbalance (possibly genetic)
  • Other illness
  • Poor diet (e.g., seeds only)
  • Increased daylight

How does excessive egg-laying affect the health of the bird?

Chronic or excessive egg-laying may cause multiple health problems, most of them related to the nutritional demands of producing eggs, especially the need for calcium and protein.

Complications include:
  • Egg binding, which can occur if the shells of the eggs become softer due to calcium deficiency
  • Osteoporosis, which could eventually lead to broken bones
  • Weight loss
  • Feather loss and mild skin irritation around the cloaca
  • Malnutrition


How is excessive egg-laying treated?

A variety of therapy options are used to treat hens who lay eggs excessively. Generally a combination of therapies need to be used.
  • Behavioral modification: Changing the environment and removing the stimulus to lay eggs can help. These need to be done gradually so they do not further stress the bird.
  • If the bird is especially attached to one person in the household, that person should have less interactions with the bird and not pet or groom the bird, as this may be interpreted by the bird as mating behavior. Instead, interactions with the bird that include foraging for food and training should be substituted.
  • Change the bird's cage or location in the home.
  • Decrease the bird's exposure to light and household activity to 8 to 10 hours a day.
  • Two parakeets in a hutch:
  • Move cage mates to a different cage, away from the hen. They may need to be separated far enough away so they cannot even hear each other.
  • Items in the cage that may stimulate laying or serve as a "mate," such as mirrors and toys (e.g., small plastic birds), should be removed and replaced with other objects such as foraging toys.
  • Remove nesting materials and anything in the cage that could be used as a nest.
  • Avoid feeding any warm or soft foods, or table foods other than vegetables. Avoid sugary and fatty foods. If on a seed diet, switch to a pelleted diet.

Medical treatment:

To promote the health of the bird and to slow down or prevent more egg laying, the following treatments may be advised by your veterinarian in addition to the changes described above:
  • Correction of any nutritional deficiencies is essential. This may include the administration of vitamins, minerals, changing the amount of calories, and changing or adding protein sources.
  • Administration of hormones, such as leuprolide to stop egg laying.
  • Surgery to remove the reproductive tract (spaying) may be used to permanently stop the egg laying. This is a high-risk procedure in birds because of their very small size, and the delicateness of the reproductive tract.

Additional Resources:
https://www.harrisonsbirdfoods.com/c...at-you-can-do/
https://www.vcahospitals.com/main/pe...g-in-birds/812
https://yarmouthvetcenter.com/yvcipe...gg-laying.html
https://carrolltonwestpet.com/veteri...ying-pet-bird/

EDIT by FaeryBee:
Another option to ask your vet about is Deslorelin 4.7mg size
It's an implant the size of a grain of rice they put just under the skin between the budgie's wings.
Only an Avian Vet can administer this procedure.
The implant can be good between 6 to 18 months depending on the size and hormone strength of the bird


JanineBudgies likes this.

__________________


Last edited by FaeryBee; 01-23-2019 at 08:16 PM.
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
 



Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:07 AM.



Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright © 2000- 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © 2006 - , 2403 Networks LLC. All rights reserved.