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Go Back   Talk Budgies Forums > Budgie Talk > Budgie Breeding


Budgie Breeding Before breeding any species, it is important to learn as much about the animals, their personalities and the best practices to follow for responsible and ethical breeding prior to making the commitment to take on the responsibility.

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  #21  
Old 12-18-2015, 10:09 PM
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it kind of makes me sick that those kinds of people even exist. I am aware of several breeders who breed the birds non stop without a break until they die and make a significant profit from the offspring (I'm talking $115.00 for a hand tame budgie and an extra $50.00 for a starter guide as an example as a prolific breeder who is 15 and doesn't care about anything other than money.) I only ever breed my birds if they are showing signs of wanting to breed- then select the eager birds and pair up birds that will strengthen the bloodline and produce healthy babies (health always comes first) for one clutch a season, maybe two if the hen starts laying again before the last chick has fledged. I don't believe in breeding animals just cause you 'like' to get something out of it, whether that be money or your own enjoyment. In a way I guess this can be compared to the human slave trade- slave traders like it because they make a profit and the slave's 'owners' like it because they get to be lazy and get off on seeing others suffer.

Because I do have such strong feelings and direct opinions towards the matter of careless breeding, I do get upset when I see posts on here, I have gotten angry and unintentionally rude at these particular people for doing the wrong thing. It shouldn't just be reading up on the basics, breeding consists of so much more- genetics and how two gene pool crosses will correspond, characteristics of the parents, size and feather of the parents, the question of if the birds are up to the budgerigar standard, problems you will encounter when breeding, the health of the birds, the parental potentials and why you even want to breed them-

Is it for money, your own satisfaction or as part of the birds natural reproductive cycle?

To answer the question every bird owner should be asking themselves, I do not breed for money or my own satisfaction. I allow my birds to breed to their own accord and at the same time I get to exhibit their wonderful babies and themselves. The satisfaction I get from breeding is the satisfaction of the parents raising their own family- and the fact they have created a champion bloodline of amazing show birds.

I am so glad Deb has made brought this vast matter of inexperience up, I really hope these people read carefully what Deb has pointed out and take a seat- If it's meant to be your birds will eventually bless you with babies in they're own time- when THEY are ready.

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  #22  
Old 12-19-2015, 01:48 AM
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Excellent post Deborah, and an important one too! Since budgies are so plentiful and easy to acquire, this tempts many people both young and older to simply buy a male and female without any regard to knowledge - previous posts here have said it well.

I also wanted to touch upon another aspect that really NEEDS to be looked at and taken seriously when breeding. Not only knowledge on basic budgie care, but the lack of acknowledgment of contagious avian diseases and their control really gets to me!! This is sadly not something that will go away if ignored by inexperienced bird owners and breeders. Quite the opposite. There will always be contagious viral (deadly and incurable in most cases) disease in captive (and wild) population, but not taking precautions with contagious disease seriously (and bothering to learn about it in the first place) is what will keep these diseases all too common in our captive bird community.

Not only with budgies, but yes I'm talking about budgies because not only is this a budgie forum, but also because budgies are common, there are SO many inexperienced and ignorant "backyard breeders" of budgies, who don't know the first thing about disease control, that it truly scares me. Because of this I don't go to bird marts anymore, and I only like to buy birds from reputable breeders who use the closed aviary system of disease contol. Yes I bought Twigs and Mink from stores, but generally speaking that makes me nervous. I got them tested for several of the more common diseases upon buying them. The tests cost twice as much as Mink and many times more than Twigs. I don't care, it was worth it. I once had a Pionus parrot who I got at a small bird store. I thought the owner was nice, but they weren't knowledgeable I found out later. My bird died of PDD and vet said it was most likely from the nest (as PDD usually is). She was bought by the store from a broker who got her from who knows where.

Sorry to go on, but I just wanted to stress something I know is not taken seriously enough by many in the pet bird community.

Again, this is a great thread Deborah .
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Old 12-19-2015, 07:48 AM
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This thread is excellent, and yes I also get frustrated and angry at others stupidity. BUT I myself am guilty of doing the exact act.
I was given two budgies as a present a few years ago, I felt sorry for them so I bought a much larger aviary for them and then added two other budgies. I also added two nest boxes so they could have one each, I was very thoughtful wasn't I?
I desperately began searching for some help when I came across a bloodied and severely injured chick, Budget thankfully survived and is alive today due to this Forum and it's staff., as most of you know he is my precious baby boy who we absolutely love to the moon and back.Sadly another chick didn't survive
I was totally to blame, this is how simple and easy theses situations happen, only the lucky few survive.
I am so thankful that I have learnt to care for and treat my birds with the respect and love they deserve.
Also, many budgies are given to young children who through no fault of their own have the maturity or parents that are willing to help care for and look after the birds as they should be. There needs to be a whole new way of thinking as to giving any animal as a gift.
I purposely only have male budgies now as I do not have the experience or knowledge to care for and raise chicks responsibly.
I am so thankful for this Forum the amount of wisdom that is here for all to share is amazing, Thankyou Deborah for bringing up this topic.
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  #24  
Old 12-20-2015, 03:38 PM
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Smile A Heartfelt Plea

Hi Cathy. What a courageous admission!!! Some where in the past each and every experienced person who shares life with a companion bird has been guilty of unmeaning neglect. We have to change daily as new info is tested and applied to help us provide the best of care for our feathered friends.

My first experience with a bird was a male canary named Jimmy after my uncle who was away fighting for our safety as a country. I was quite young and so I assisted my mom with Jimmy's care. Jimmy ate egg biscut with vitamins and canary seed and gravel. His breeder gave him a drop of whiskey when he got a cold. Jimmy was with us for 8+ years. We did the best we knew for our Jimmy, but by today's standards it would be considered low quality care. We all have to start some where to learn about and care for the various small birds and animals available in pet stores or from breeders.

These companion birds and animals give each of us opportunities to bond with and learn to care for other animal species. We develop a sense of responsibility for care and we learn to bond with these little ones. I was blessed to have grandparents that cared for a variety of domestic and wild birds and animals. We had Daisymae the orphaned raccoon from an illegal hunter on my grandparents land. There were 2 kits that 2 volunteer families raised and released back to the wild.
There are millions of families facing the new experience of sheltering and caring for companion birds or small animals. In past times Many children grew up on farms and experienced the reality of raising domestic stock to feed humans. This is a hard one for me, but I remember Going with my grandfather down the road to another farm where my grandfather purchased eggs and a fat hen for sunday Dinner, my favorite Slippery dumplings and chicken. The chicken was prepared start to finish by my grandmother, who had a pair of pet bantum chickens that liked to ride around the property in her huge apron that she collected fruits and veggies in to prepare our meals. today we have a huge disconnect as all we have to do is buy prepackaged cuts of meat at the grocery store. Those who lived further from the farm could go to the local butcher shop and buy a cut of meat take it home and cut it into meal portions and freeze for later use if you were lucky enough to have a freezer. Other meat could be preserved in brine and smoked etc. We have come a long way today. Forty years ago in Embryology class in college we grew our own chick embryos in an incubator and day by day we learned to harvest and prepare each stage of the embryo to be fixed and viewed under a microscope. This was a great process because we actually learned to prepare our own class tools when finally the last 3 chicks hatched it was my job to feed and care for the chicks until they grew into big white hens. At the end of the semester they were given to a local farm. There again we experienced a connection between the origin us as students and the the chickens which eventually returned to a farm. A few years later I worked as a volunteer in a bird sanctuary. We received frozen new born male chicks that were rejected because they were not hens. These chicks became the food for injurred and handicaped Raptors that lived at the sanctuary. At that time there were 2 permanently injured bald eagles in residence. They were later placed in a zoo to hopefully produce chicks that could be set free to replaced wild eagles that died from DDT effecting the eggs. There were also Brown Pelicans with the same problems. The injured birds were kept in large fly away pens so that the young could grow up and fly back to replenish the wild population. Few people today are blessed with such hands on experience.

Many children raised in the big cities today are afraid of even the smallest bird or mouse or butterfly or grasshopper or praying mantis. there is an essential disconnect from the natural world. So bless you each one who comes to Talk Budgies to gain the knowledge needed to care for our companion animals. Talk Budgies is here to assist people seeking knowledge about how to properly care for our feathered friends that we have adopted from the wild and partially domesticated to become companion birds. Many times experienced Members feel great pain for the accidents that happen to
birds owned by inexperienced people. But this is why we volunteer here to help other people to be skilled bird keepers. So God Bless you Cathy and Budget for accepting the challenge and learning together to be friends.
Jo Ann
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Old 12-20-2015, 06:14 PM
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I totally agree with your post, Deb! In fact, I think that this post should be on the home page of this forum, so anyone who enters the page should read that first and then ask anything he/she wants. I've seen this a lot of times, inexperienced breeders, irresponsible pet owners asking for help when the bad/serious things have already happened. It's really bad when there are deaths, agressive behaviours in a flock or illnesses and the owners are just ignorant.
All the bird owners, breeders, please read, research and learn before you decide that you want to breed your birds! Birds have personalities, they are little souls that depend on us for their well-being...
Thanks again for your post Deborah, and I really hope that more people will read this and take the right decisions.
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Old 10-30-2016, 05:56 PM
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One more thing I am not sure has been mentioned. Breeding babies will also inevitably go wrong at some point. Are you prepared to take those birds, parents or babies tot he vet and pay for treatment when needed. You have the risks of egg binding in the hen, parents mutilating babies, slow crop , sour crops with all sorts of bacteria and yeasts that can happen. One quick visit to the vet can eat up every cent you will make from selling your clutch and can even leave you in the hole.. This is one of the risks you take when breeding and you cannot ignore the heath of the creatures you have brought into this world because of the cost.
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