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  #1  
Old 04-06-2015, 12:24 AM
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Default Adding anothee budgie?

I have had my male budgie for 5 months now and he's fully tamed.
I have been planning to get another male budgie. Is this a good idea? I want the new budgie to be well bonded with me as well and not just my current budgie. And will I loose my bond with the budgie I already have?

I will be putting them in different cages, and they won't be able to see each other unless they are out of the cage.

Please tell me what I should consider before going through with this. I wish to be bonded with both budgies.

Also, I saw these handicapped budgies and I really wanted to take care of one. Is it possible to bond with them if they don't have working legs? I know it's not the smartest question but I want to be sure. Also, what extra care would I need to provide to a handicapped budgie?

Thanks

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Old 04-06-2015, 12:42 AM
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I had Russell before I got Oliver and though they became friends and are even cage mates, Russell is still sweet. We've even become closer these past months simply because it's even longer that Russell has gotten to know and trust me. Sometimes he even climbs onto me arm and up my shirt to sit on my shoulder just because he wants to. It also didn't stop Oliver and I from creating a trusting relationship. Now, I recently added a third Budgie, a baby like the other two were, and he wants nothing to do with me. He steps up fine, but now that he has bonded tightly with one of the other birds, he's not interested in a friendship with me. It wasn't like that with Oliver and he was a parent raised, newly weaned baby when I got him. i admit that I always had Russell and Oliver together on my shoulder or wirh me, but wirh the new baby, I let him be better friends with Oliver than me. It can totally be done the way you want. I have two Parrotlets also. They are best friends and very bonded. But they love to be with people too, and will step up for anyone and sit happily on their shoulder.
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Old 04-06-2015, 05:01 AM
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That was helpful are all your budgies clipped?
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Old 04-06-2015, 05:23 AM
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Hi ruparelia!
I think it's always a good idea to give a bird like a budgie a friend of the same species that he can "talk to in his own language" and that can provide birdies-company. No matter how great a human friend you are, you'll never be 100% fluent in Budgie and you would be a strange kind of human if you had a beak for preening. Fingers just aren't quite the same. There's also (in my opinion) nothing sweeter to watch than budgies playing together.

I've been taking care of rescue budgies, many of them handicapped, for about two and a half decades. I always have groups of budgies that are kept together. When I was living with my parents or in an apartment, I usually had a large cage, now that I own a complete house, the birds have a room of their own in which they are free all day.
My experience both with handicapped and non-handicapped budgies is that whether they get tame or not is not so much a matter of how many you have or what their physical limitations are. They're very unique personalities. At the moment I have six, out of which two are extremely hand-tame and will even actively seek me out for cuddles. The one on the exactly other end of the spectrum of my flock will basically disappear into hiding the moment anyone enters the bird room ("I swear I have six birds in here..."). The other three are different stages of tame to hand-tame between that. I've always found it easier to tame a new bird if I had an already-tame one they could watch interact with me. Nevertheless, please be aware that you will never have a guarantee that any specific budgie will bond with you. Some just don't lean that way.

In my current budgie flock, my most cuddly bird is completely deaf (or as close to as really makes zero difference) and has a lot of trouble balancing; one is nearly blind. two have minor handicaps that don't impair them much in a controlled environment without predators. The other two are physically fine. This flock works out as it is. I have once seen a situation in the past, though in my sister's flock, where an able-bodied budgie wouldn't tolerate a somewhat badly handicapped one. (Even though the latter had been part of the flock before the former was added).
I've had birds with a large variety of handicaps over the years, I'll gladly make suggestions for adaptations and things if you decide to go down that road and know what kind of bird you're getting!
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Old 04-06-2015, 12:02 PM
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Alright great I'll keep you guys updated
Also, I want to make a playgym myself. Any creative ideas you have, please share
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Old 04-06-2015, 02:20 PM
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Originally Posted by ruparelia View Post
That was helpful are all your budgies clipped?
Let me say first that I agree with AlterEgon. There is nothing like a Budgie friend for a Budgie. It is possible to have two who love each other who still very much like you. One can be happy and have a good life, but I am so glad I have more than one because I work and with my son's sports, we can be gone a lot.

My two older ones came to me clipped. Though Russell is missing part of his right wing, so clipping him wasn't necessary. He will never be able to even gracefully glide. Oliver was fully clipped and going through a molt right now. I will let him keep his flight feathers, but give him a small safety clip. My newest Budgie came to me flighted and I have kept him like that. He chooses to fly for exercise to get to a higher place than the others, but he doesn't fly away from me if I have him to step up. My two Parrotlets are flighted and they don't use their abilities to fly away from me, it's the opposite - they come to me.
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Old 04-07-2015, 01:39 AM
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That's nice to hear
Did it take longer to tame the flighted budgie as compared to your clipped budgies? I would like to tame a flighted budgie preferably but my room has a good height, it will take me forever to chase him around the room if he doesn't go back in the cage.
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Old 04-07-2015, 03:07 AM
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Luring them down is better than chasing. Food can be a very strong incentive, especially if the cage is the only place where they can get it. Personally, I find flighted birds to be more confident and also, knowing they can get away in a pinch, bolder and more inquisitive than non-flighted ones.

In light of your earlier post, though: If you are indeed going to get a bird that does not have full use of its legs, never, ever, clip its wings. Do not take away any creature's already limited ability of independent movement from point A to B!
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Old 04-07-2015, 01:35 PM
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Originally Posted by ruparelia View Post
That's nice to hear
Did it take longer to tame the flighted budgie as compared to your clipped budgies? I would like to tame a flighted budgie preferably but my room has a good height, it will take me forever to chase him around the room if he doesn't go back in the cage.

No, he was pulled from the nest box after a couple of weeks and hand fed. He didn't want to fly away from us or the other birds. He flew for the fun being able to fly. If you get and keep your budgie flighted and it's not hand tame, do the hand taming exercises inside the cage before you give it free access in your room.

I again agree with AlterEgon. If the bird cannot use its legs, I would not clip its wings. Can you imagine the constant anxiety the bird would feel? Sure, when they are fledging, they have to learn to fly, turn, and land. Some are far clumsier than others. But they are quick learners. Because of the layout of my house, the fact that my birds are out of their cage most of the time, and the others living the house, for their safety, I did a safety clip. None of my birds fly away from us or even the dogs. They use their wings more to get from play area to play area and to come to us and each other. There are times I have to cage them, like when I'm cooking, because they seek me out.

And do NOT chase your bird unless you need to get it immediately to save it from imminent danger. You will only weaken your bond with it. I don't give millet except as a special treat now and again. If you do this with your new Budgie and you can't get it back down to you, open the cage door and let it see you put a nice fat sprig of millet in the cage. If you move away from the cage, or maybe even leave the room, that would be my suggested way to get the bird back into the cage.

Please keep us posted. A calm human who has never given the bird reason to fear it will be the best person you can be for your Budgies. It can take some birds a week, some several months. When an animal can sense that you're saying "Hey, we'll move on your terms. I'm just here to be your pal and we'll take it slow since we don't speak each other's language and I can't tell you my intentions", it will trust you eventually.

I learned this from a Cesar Milan book like twenty years ago: He spoke of how a predator like a lion can walk across the land and sometimes prey animals will bolt and sometimes they will keep grazing while keeping a watchful eye. They can sense its energy. They feel whether or not the lion is on the lookout for someone weak or off guard, or if the lion is just on her way to find some water or shade. I keep that in mind when interacting with animals. I don't stare even if it's beautiful; I look to the side, not straight at it's eyes except briefly; I talk to it in a pleasant voice so that I'm announcing my presence, not trying to sneak up on it; and I move deliberately. Sometimes I walk away, and then return, speaking slowly so that they understand I am announcing my arrival and that I'm once again right there, but have made no moves. Except to offer a special treat - that is something few animals can resist.
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