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Go Back   Talk Budgies Forums > Budgie Talk > Budgie Breeding > Mutations and Genetics


Mutations and Genetics Learn about budgie genetics and the wide variety of mutations.
Thread Description:colour differences

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Old 03-27-2009, 03:25 PM
 
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Question Wild vs captivity

So I understand general genetics, dominate/ recessive stuff. But I have been watching a lot of stuff on wild budgies on you tube and I know in the wild they are all normal green. I can see that through selective breeding we can get so many beautiful variations but why does this not happen in the wild? And if we introduce some of our mutations into the wild, will we have different budgie colours? Or maybe the normal green is the most dominate? I just don't get it. Do they breed in the wild to keep their colours as is because it is most beneficial to the species?

Does anyone know the answer? Any thoughts would be great. I just thought it would be interesting to see some blue and pied budgies in the wild.

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Old 03-27-2009, 03:34 PM
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In the wild the green is the best color for them. If there is a blue budgie he stands out and probably doesn't live long

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Old 03-27-2009, 04:07 PM
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that makes sense
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Old 03-27-2009, 04:34 PM
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yah i always wondered about that too! Great questions!!! i wonder if anyone else has any other information on what if we tried to breed many varitions of other types of budgies in the wild what would it be like, and why it hasnt already occured. I would assume that those who own budgies in Australia have had budgies escape and i donno if they'd ever manage to somehow find others of their kind... but what if a blue budgie mated with a green one...
i guess maybe it has happened but as Sigrid said they would be more prone to predators due to their colors standing out... hmmm...
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Old 03-27-2009, 05:41 PM
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There are a lot of records indicating that there have been sightings and trappings of dark factor (possibly violet factor too), opaline and albino birds from records during the 18th and 19th century. Natural mutations occur just as frequently in the wild, however without captive breeding it can be almost impossible to make a new mutation viable given that birds with different appearances caused by mutations stand out and lose the protection of 'blending in' with the rest of the flock.

Typically these birds are singled out and killed by predators as it is easier to keep them in sight.
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Old 03-27-2009, 05:55 PM
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Mutations do occur in the wild but they don't last very long. The first Blue budgies were captured in the early 1800's and a pair of these birds were sent to England. Often with the Ino birds the parents will actually kill them in the nest as they can see the red eyes glowing in the dark and instinctively know these birds will be a danger if they survive.

It is not unusual to find opalines, cinnamonwings and greywings in the wild. You will sometimes even find the Grey Greens, they don't seem to stand out like a Blue or a Pied bird would. A flock of thousands of green birds with a blue bird in the middle stands out pretty strongly and the Hawks head straight for them. Coloured birds are often killed by other budgies because of the danger they pose to the rest of the flock.
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Old 03-27-2009, 06:17 PM
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wow,talk about being the odd one out.
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Old 03-27-2009, 06:31 PM
 
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Ya. Thanks guys. It is neat to think of our budgies being "special" hahaha. I figured they wouldn't last long in the wild. They sure are beautiful though!
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