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hermit_crab 12-29-2009 01:04 AM

Budgie pairing
 
I have a light green cinnamon opaline hen budgie. If I pair it with a sky blue normal will the green be dominant, or will the babys be a greeny-blue mix? And what are the chances of the babys being cinnamon?

Jimm-V 12-29-2009 01:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hermit_crab (Post 564545)
I have a light green cinnamon opaline hen budgie. If I pair it with a sky blue normal will the green be dominant, or will the babys be a greeny-blue mix? And what are the chances of the babys being cinnamon?

The genetics of budgerigars are as follows :

1. Cinnamon - sex-linked gene, meaning there must be 2 genes to show in a male

2. Opaline - sex-linked gene, meaning there must be 2 genes to show in a male

3. Green - dominant gene over blue

4. Blue - recessive gene to green

If the skyblue normal male is NOT split for cinnamon/opaline, the offsprings will be 50% green normal female split for blue and 50% green normal male split for cinnamon/opaline.

If the skyblue normal male is split for cinnamon/opaline, the offsprings will be 50% green normal female split for blue and 50% green cinnamon opaline male.

2many 12-30-2009 11:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jimm-V (Post 564551)
If the skyblue normal male is split for cinnamon/opaline, the offsprings will be 50% green normal female split for blue and 50% green cinnamon opaline male.


Wouldn't the females be the ones to show the cinnamon and/or opaline in this scenario? Females are more likely to show the sex linked genes, because they are on the x chromosome, correct?

Jimm-V 12-30-2009 11:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 2many (Post 565645)
Wouldn't the females be the ones to show the cinnamon and/or opaline in this scenario? Females are more likely to show the sex linked genes, because they are on the x chromosome, correct?

2many, you are right, probably I got the percentage wrong.

It should be :

If the skyblue normal male is split for cinnamon/opaline, the offsprings will be 25% green cinnamon opaline female, 25% green normal female split for blue and 50% green cinnamon opaline male. All offsprings will be green if the mother hen is not split for blue. If she is split for blue, then there will be both colours, green and blue.

sunna 12-31-2009 02:05 AM

i dont think it would be that simple with a cock that is split for both opaline and cinnamon. Do the cinnamon and opaline gene move together all the time? cant some chicks be opaline and not cinnamon, or the other way round? cud someone please explain.

Jimm-V 12-31-2009 02:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sunna (Post 565710)
i dont think it would be that simple with a cock that is split for both opaline and cinnamon. Do the cinnamon and opaline gene move together all the time? cant some chicks be opaline and not cinnamon, or the other way round? cud someone please explain.

Cinnamon and opaline are entirely different genes, not moving together. In other words, cinnamon means cinnamon only, opaline means opaline only. If both cinnamon and opaline are present, then both cinnamon and opaline appearing together. It depends on the cock whether what gene is he split to ? This also depends on his parentage whether you are aware of their mutation or not.

tonic 12-31-2009 03:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jimm-V (Post 565723)
Cinnamon and opaline are entirely different genes, not moving together. In other words, cinnamon means cinnamon only, opaline means opaline only. If both cinnamon and opaline are present, then both cinnamon and opaline appearing together. It depends on the cock whether what gene is he split to ? This also depends on his parentage whether you are aware of their mutation or not.

although they can be carried on the same x chromosome or on separate ones in the cock bird. so they can be passed on together or separately depending on this...

sunna 12-31-2009 04:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jimm-V (Post 565723)
Cinnamon and opaline are entirely different genes, not moving together. In other words, cinnamon means cinnamon only, opaline means opaline only. If both cinnamon and opaline are present, then both cinnamon and opaline appearing together. It depends on the cock whether what gene is he split to ? This also depends on his parentage whether you are aware of their mutation or not.

thank u for confirming that cinnamon and opaline are entirely different genes. which brings to my earlier question. if they are NOT moving together, then even if the cock is split for both cinnamon and opaline, the chicks do not have to get both genes together right? one chick could inherit ONLY the opaline, while the other inherits ONLY the cinnamon, and another might get BOTH cinnamon and opaline together. this is my understanding of how the genes might move.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jimm-V (Post 565654)
2many, you are right, probably I got the percentage wrong.

It should be :

If the skyblue normal male is split for cinnamon/opaline, the offsprings will be 25% green cinnamon opaline female, 25% green normal female split for blue and 50% green cinnamon opaline male. All offsprings will be green if the mother hen is not split for blue. If she is split for blue, then there will be both colours, green and blue.

IF they move seperately, then i assume the possible outcomes will include: cinnamon males/females,
opaline males/females,
cinnamon opaline males/females,
cinnamon males split to opaline,
opaline males split to cinnamon,
normal males split to opaline,
normal males slpit to cinnamon,
normal males split to both opaline and cinnamon, and
normal females.

(the above possibile outcomes are without color consideration)


i am no guru in genetics, but this is how i assume it would work from what i have read, from friends and the little experience of breeding budgies.

would appreciate if someone could shed some light on my confusion.
thanks

2many 12-31-2009 10:46 PM

That sounds right to me :).

nev90 01-01-2010 06:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hermit_crab (Post 564545)
I have a light green cinnamon opaline hen budgie. If I pair it with a sky blue normal will the green be dominant, or will the babys be a greeny-blue mix? And what are the chances of the babys being cinnamon?

What you get from this pair will depend on the genes the parents carry. To get any opaline or cinnamon in the chicks the cock bird would have to have genes for one of these mutations. If either of these mutations appear they will be visible in the chicks of both sexes.
Here are some possible outcomes:

If the hen is not split for blue and the cock is not split for either opaline or cinnamon you’d get:
100% normal green chicks
All the chicks would be split for blue
All the males would be split for both opaline & cinnamon


If the hen is split for blue and the cock is not split for either opaline or cinnamon you’d get:
50% normal green
50% normal blue
All the green chicks would be split for blue
All the males would be split for both opaline & cinnamon


If the hen is not split for blue and the cock is split for opaline but not cinnamon you’d get:
50% normal green (both sexes)
50% opaline green (both sexes)
All the chicks would be split for blue
All the males would be split for cinnamon
All the non opaline males would be split for opaline


If the hen is split for blue and the cock is split for opaline but not cinnamon you’d get:
25% normal blue
25% opaline blue
25% normal green
25% opaline green

If the hen is split for blue and the cock is split for cinnamon but not opaline you’d get:
25% normal blue
25% cinnamon blue
25% normal green
25% cinnamon green

If the hen is split for blue and the cock is split for both cinnamon and opaline you’d get:
12.5% normal blue
12.5% opaline blue
12.5% cinnamon blue
12.5% opaline cinnamon blue
12.5% normal green
12.5% opaline green
12.5% cinnamon green
12.5% opaline cinnamon green

There is of course always the possibility that the birds could have genes for other mutations that could show in up to 25% of the chicks


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