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Go Back   Talk Budgies Forums > Budgie Talk > Budgie Breeding > Mutations and Genetics


Mutations and Genetics Learn about budgie genetics and the wide variety of mutations.
Thread Description:what do you think?

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  #21  
Old 11-29-2010, 02:56 PM
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I don't really like the look of pure english budgies they look a bit to broad and not really agile. One of my budgies is 25% english budgie which makes him a bit more sedate, sturdy and really handsome, but I'm probably biased.
You can see in the picture that he is a good bit bigger then Snitch who is what you call american (?) (The are called normal and standard where I live)
I think breeding tameness should be possible after all a budgie who is curious and doesn't scare easily is easier to tame
good luck!
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  #22  
Old 11-29-2010, 03:01 PM
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Ah, not the study I was looking for, but here's a great one about selective breeding for tameness in parrots:
https://www.silvio-co.com/cps/article...99jmurphy1.htm

Here's an interesting snippet from the article:
Quote:
All domestic birds and mammals display the trait of perpetual juvenility and that trait is referred to as neoteny—which means genetically extending juvenile characteristics into adulthood. Selecting for this most essential juvenile characteristic is practiced in the commercial animal breeding industries of today. Ostrich breeders in South Africa select out the aggressive males for the meat market and retain the calm, less aggressive males for breeding stock and thus pass the tamer, more juvenile disposition down to the next generation. New Zealand elk breeders striving to rapidly domesticate this member of the North American deer family select out the unmanageable bulls and cows and use these individuals to stimulate the consumer meat market. The ostriches and the elk are becoming domesticated. They are becoming neotenized. So can it be with companion parrots. And in my opinion, must come to pass if we are to reduce the Misery Index of wild parrots in our living room and reduce the theft of wild parrots from the forest or their ancestors. It is only by producing a domesticated companion bird so superior to the wild type that we can ever expect to dampen the theft from the wild.

Perpetuating juvenile behavior into adulthood through selection for tameness has other seemingly unrelated consequences. Territorial defense behavior that is seen primarily as adult behavior decreases greatly. That translates into a dramatic drop in nest site aggression in your breeding birds and decreased cage-site territorial aggression in the home. These are qualities that are greatly desired in the companion bird breeding business. Again, genetically tame and calm birds are in themselves much more satisfied in their urban homes.

The most striking recent well documented example of selection for tameness comes out of Russia. Geneticist D. K. Belyaev studied Red foxes (Vulpes fulva) reared for their fur. These animals have been reared in semi-natural fur farms for over 100 years and were selected for fur traits—not behavior traits. The captive foxes demonstrated three distinctly different characteristic responses to humans. Thirty percent were extremely aggressive toward man, 60% were either fearful or aggressively fearful, and 10% displayed a quite exploratory reaction without either fear or aggression. The objective was to breed animals similar in behavior to domestic dogs by selecting and breeding the tamest individuals. Twenty years later the experiment succeeded in turning wild foxes into tame, border collie-like fox-dogs. The highly selected "tame" fox-dogs actively sought human contact and would whine and wag their tails when people approached. This behavior was in sharp contrast to the wild foxes that showed fearful and aggressive behavior to humans.
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Old 11-29-2010, 03:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leoanna View Post
I think breeding tameness should be possible after all a budgie who is curious and doesn't scare easily is easier to tame
good luck!
The one drawback would be that it can more readily get into trouble.

There was a very interesting show about dogs recently which looked at that study in more detail.

I think I would want to aim for health and longevity first and then start using the tamest of the healthy birds.
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  #24  
Old 11-29-2010, 04:08 PM
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Quote:
The one drawback would be that it can more readily get into trouble.
That's true but watching them is way more fun if the bird is curious, you look away and suddenly your budgie is bathing in your glass of cold tea *lol*
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