Talk Budgies Forums banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can an albino be split or have hidden genes as well? Or is an albino, just an albino?

Can't regular budgies also be split for albinism too?

And do people sometimes specifically breed for albino budgies?

Or do they just "show up" in breedings.

Just curious!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,172 Posts
well, albinos can be split for anything as well, yes a **** bird can be split for albino or lutino or other mutations, people do sometimes breed albinos for a reason, sometimes they just show up!! :D hopefully dat helped!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,140 Posts
Can an albino be split or have hidden genes as well? Or is an albino, just an albino?
They can be split for recessive mutations if that is what you are asking.

Can't regular budgies also be split for albinism too?
What are you calling a "regular" budgie????... American, English, Wild type, Pet?????

Are you asking about a visual NORMAL?

Albion or Lutino is a sex linked mutation. This means it's on the female gean. Cocks have to have 2 copies of this gean to show the mutation. If they don't they "hide the mutation" also known as being split for the mutation. Hen have only 1 copy of the mutation to show it. Thus can NEVER be split for the mutation.

And do people sometimes specifically breed for albino budgies?

Or do they just "show up" in breedings.
Some English exhibition budgie breeder specialize in one or more mutations. Albinos and Lutions are the hardest mutation to breed for AND keep the large size and quality of the bird up to show standards. These people read and seek out birds that are visual or split albinos/lutions. As for this "just happening" If you don't have a pedigree on the bird to know what is in it's background then yes you just might have this pop up unexpectedly.

Once you understand genetics and a long historical pedigree on the birds, breeding no longer tosses surprises. (as many surprises as in when something brand new never before seen shows up)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks! I was just curious thats all. I know in some species breeding for albinos is unethical (like pugs). I didn't know if in the "budgie world" this was the same way or not. It was interesting to learn that they are saught after in the "english budgie world".

I do understand gentics :) I'm an expert in the merle gene, LOL. I'm not a bird breeder though. But I do understand the basics of color/pattern inheritance in any species when it is explained to me.

By "regular" budgie, I just ment "pigmented" or a one of regular, non-albino/lutino coloring.

thanks!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,273 Posts
hi there,

i think in many species albinism comes with other negative features. in budgies it is simply the removal of melanin, so there are no ethical issues.

they are not really sought after in the english budige world. it is just that some people that breed budgies to show have specialised in albinos and lutinos (like albino but all yellow). but some people that breed budgies for pets also specialise in them...

the merle gene, are you a dog breeder? or is it something else?
 

·
Optimus Prime
Joined
·
4,046 Posts
yep your questions have pretty much been answered.

i have one though if its not too much trouble, dont albinos have like half the eyesight of normals? or is that just rats...
 

·
Member of the Month January 2009
Joined
·
3,676 Posts
yep your questions have pretty much been answered.

i have one though if its not too much trouble, dont albinos have like half the eyesight of normals? or is that just rats...
Just rats. Any differences in their eye sight is too slight to be noticed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
The ino gene is sexlinked mutation so only males can be split for ino and albino(male or female) budgies can also hide or be split for other genes.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top