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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Attached are photos of a bird that came from the set of parents in the first picture. Because mom is not an albino, it seems this bird MUST be a female. I'm assuming mom is cinnamon and dad is split for albino, and the combination of their genes gave me this lacewing - she's about 5 months old, and has molted. Here is what causes me to go "hmm:"

1. She bobs her head all the time.
2. She's always feeding females.
3. She sings ALL day long.
4. She's VERY gentle and sweet - NEVER bites, much like my male English budgies. She does have a part English dad, however.
5. She is clearly not simply albino, but lacewing. I know this gene is transmitted the same way the albino gene is transmitted, making it impossible for this bird to be a male. So why is she behaving like this? Am I missing something or is this just a particularly testosterone filled female lacewing?

I have included pictures taken both with and without flash because her appearance is significantly different in the different lighting situations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I have read some information regarding the iris ring in albinos and lutinos, as well as in lacewings. I beg to differ the opinion of this person, quoted from:

http://www.budgerigars.co.uk/rare/lw_ghalib.html

The Lacewing Budgerigar is another mutation that has a similar appearance to the Lutino and Albino with the clear body colour of yellow (in the green series) or white (in the blue series) and having the red eye as well. Perhaps the interest in this variety is restricted in comparison to the two Ino varieties but still has its appeal to many including myself. All the above varieties come from one and the same factor. This has the effect of eliminating the melanin of the black pigment in the feathers and even the eyes of the bird and therefore turning the bird from a green or a blue to a clear yellow or white with that red eye effect. The Lacewing variety is similar in appearance to that of the Lutino and Albino as they have a clear body colour, yellow or white. But the marking on cheeks, back of head, neck, wings and tail is of cinnamon brown. The cheek patches are of pale violet instead of silvery white in the Ino variety and they have well defined cinnamon brown throat spots. They have fleshy pink feet and the cocks also have a fleshy pink cere. Eyes are the same as the Inos; red with a white iris ring.
I have two lacewings, 3 albinos and 2 lutinos. All 5 of the albinos/lutinos have no iris ring, but the two lacewings DO. There is so much conflicting information on the web that I had to do my own research in my own bird room. Is this what you all have found in regard to iris rings and albino/lutinos and even lacewings?
 

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Human Bird Gym
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You are right, she must be female. I have 2 females, the youngest of which sings quite often. I don't believe that females don't sing as much as males because my youngest female sings as often as my males. The other female has always been particularly quiet however. I have no idea why she is feeding the other females, however I have seen two males feeding eachother before so I wouldn't wory.

I have a female albino as well as a male lacewing (both of the normal variety). Both have iris rings, however they are both older than 2 years. The male is approx. 2 1/2 years, and the female is closer to 5. I find that the inos/lacewings don't develop iris rings until they mature (they get lighter with age, as in all other iris ring varieties).
 

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hi there,

it will be intereseting to see if her markings darken up at all. lacewings have pale violet cheek patches so it could well be that she is a poorly marked albino. inos should have the white cheekpatches like she has.

however you are right about her being a female if the pair were separated so no other birds are possible as parents.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
hi there,

it will be intereseting to see if her markings darken up at all. lacewings have pale violet cheek patches so it could well be that she is a poorly marked albino. inos should have the white cheekpatches like she has.

however you are right about her being a female if the pair were separated so no other birds are possible as parents.

I recently learned that albinos and lutinos do not get a white iris ring until they are 1-2 years old. However, when looking at the 2 birds I consider to be lacewings, I know they are both under this age and yet have distinct iris rings. Could this be a clue?

These pictures are of the bird above. The one with 2 birds is one of her side by side with her sibling from the same clutch - a normal albino. They were hatched in January.

It's hard to see it in non-flash pictures, but with flash, and next to her sibling albinos for comparison, her violet patch does show, even if it is only slightly. I had no idea any mutation could be so dang vague!! Wish it were that you either had it and it was obvious or you didn't! LOL





 

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MOTM March 2012
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I recently learned that albinos and lutinos do not get a white iris ring until they are 1-2 years old. However, when looking at the 2 birds I consider to be lacewings, I know they are both under this age and yet have distinct iris rings. Could this be a clue?

These pictures are of the bird above. The one with 2 birds is one of her side by side with her sibling from the same clutch - a normal albino. They were hatched in January.

It's hard to see it in non-flash pictures, but with flash, and next to her sibling albinos for comparison, her violet patch does show, even if it is only slightly. I had no idea any mutation could be so dang vague!! Wish it were that you either had it and it was obvious or you didn't! LOL





She does not appear to have any mask, Lacewings have Cinnamon markings including the two long cinnamon tail feathers and cinnamon spots on their mask.

Here is a picture of an Albino hen and in the back my Lacewing ****, you can clearly see his markings and mask and his tail feathers.
 

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Member of the Month March 2011
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I agree... she just looks albino to me too. Why is you think she is lacewing?
I can see a little bit of pattern in her feathers but all albinos and lutinos tend to have that in the right lighting.
This lutino of mine has a white barring pattern on some of her head and wings but she is just a normal lutino... and she has had iris rings from a young age too like your girl :) All of my Inos have had them but I think it just depends on the specific bird as to when they appear even though a year is a general estimate :D
Also maybe your albinos/lutinos are masking some other genes that make them not have an iris like recessive pied... that could be it too. I'm sure the experts will be along soon though to tell us for sure :)
 

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Member of the Month January 2009
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Are you absolutely positive about the parentage of this bird? It looks male to me.

Lutinos & albinos will develop iris rings but because the ino gene will mask other mutations their unseen presence could effect the iris ring
 
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