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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can a dominant pied be split for recessive pied?

Can a normal **** (split for recessive pied) paired with dominant pied hen (split unknown) produce a recessive pied chick?

Thanks!
 

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If the hen is split for recessive pied you can get recessive pied chicks. Normal and Dominant pied are both dominant genes and will show up more frequently than recessive pied. To produce a recessive gene like recessive pied both parents need to have or carry the gene.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you both. :D

Dean, I've never heard of dominant pied + recessive pied. I thought the bird had to be one or the other. :S
 

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Thank you both. :D

Dean, I've never heard of dominant pied + recessive pied. I thought the bird had to be one or the other. :S
I found this to be quite odd as well when I first read it being discussed. It is the wording that threw my off (not having extensive exposure to genetics). I thought of dominant pied as, in essence, the flip side of recessive pied... as if 'pied' is one thing and pied could display in either a recessive or dominant manner.

When in reality they are two mutations no different than any other two, really, such as cinnamon and spangle, opaline and clear flight, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That's very interesting. Thank you!

When a budgie is "masking" a mutation, does that mean he's split for a mutation that's not visible?
 

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As far as i know, all pied genes are on different alleles, meaning a bird can be dominant pied + recessive pied + clearflight pied.

A dominant pied + clearflight pied seems to increase the effect of both, and the bird appears to be similar to a recessive pied - except it will have iris rings.

Clearflight pied + recessive pied = Dark eyed clear. This combination seems to boost the pied effect even greater than dominant + clearflight, resulting in a bird completely void of markings. This proves that the genes are co-dominant.

Technically a bird could be all 3, but since clearflight + recessive means you get a clear bird, it would be impossible to visually tell if it is clearflight + recessive + dominant to boot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Wow, that's fascinating. Thank you for sharing!

I think one of my 9-month juveniles is a double factor dominant pied. (He looks a lot like the sky blue example on this webpage: http://www.***************/colorsguide.html#dominantpied.) Attached is a picture of him. His only black markings are a few bars on his head and neck. His only coloring is a small patch of cobalt or sky blue on his rump. He's YF2. His flight feathers are clear. He has a purply-pink cere (like a recessive pied) but he has faint iris rings (like a dominant pied).

It's so hard to pin down some of my birds' mutations!
 

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