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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I was just wondering can you visually identify splits in Budgies? If so I'm wondering if My male is split to anything.

I also noticed in certain lighting my Albino female has a light silvery blue tent to some of her feathers. I couldn't even catch the color on camera if I tried because its so light its barley noticeable only in certain light.
 

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Tiffany,the albinos are blue series birds anyway!So the fact that she is split to blue is already known even she had not the blue tinge in her belly!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I know she is a blue series. I was just wondering about the blue showing wouldn't that mean she's not a true Albino?
 

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Hi, I was just wondering can you visually identify splits in Budgies? If so I'm wondering if My male is split to anything.
The only recognizable split I know of is a pied thumbprint on the back of a normal budgie's head. Attached is a picture of my double factor yellow face 1 normal sky blue **** bird. He has a small pied thumbprint on the back of his head. I know he's split to recessive pied because he produced several recessive pied chicks (all of whom are yellow face 1).
I also noticed in certain lighting my Albino female has a light silvery blue tent to some of her feathers. I couldn't even catch the color on camera if I tried because its so light its barley noticeable only in certain light.
I know she is a blue series. I was just wondering about the blue showing wouldn't that mean she's not a true Albino?
Sometimes the blue peeks through the clear.
Tiffany,the albinos are blue series birds anyway!So the fact that she is split to blue is already known even she had not the blue tinge in her belly!
Albinos aren't split to blue (unless having 2 blue genes is considered "blue split to blue"); they are blue.
Here are some pictures of the male. I know he is a Yellowface cobalt dominate pied.
I agree he's a yellow face (probably type 2) dominant pied cobalt. I don't see any recognizable splits in him.

The last picture is adorable! :loveeyes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks. :) The last Picture is my favorite. They follow each other around everywhere and scream for each other when separated. Its really cute when they preen each other it looks like their in love. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Could you tell me what the chicks would be for when and If I breed them? I tried using the genetic calculator but it confuses me.
 

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In the middle pic he looks green on one side and blue on the other... Or is it just the lighting? He looks like a halfsider!
 

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Some mutations will have indications that they are carrying a specific mutation in split form, but this is not always reliable and not every bird will have it so it is not a fact.

For example lack of iris rings in a normal adult, or a small pied spot on the back of the head as Susan mentioned can indicate that a bird is split for recessive pied.

A large amount of opalescence in a normal male can sometimes indicate that he is split for opaline.

Young green chicks that have a blue tinge to their belly and vent feathers before their first molt can indicate they are split for blue.

These are just a few examples, but again they are not always seen in every case of a bird being split for these things.

The blue tinge your albino has is called "suffusion". This happens when the ino gene that normally removes all pigment from the bird does not work completely, leaving a small amount of pigment that is usually seen when the light reflects just right. Those who try to breed for the standards for each mutation try their best to eliminate suffusion and do not breed for this quality, since an albino should be pure white in color with no suffusion :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you. My male does have a yellow spot on the back of his head.
 

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Thank you. My male does have a yellow spot on the back of his head.
No problem :) He is probably split for recessive pied then, but to know for sure you will need to pair him with a recessive pied hen or one that is at least split for it. If he is split for it you should get recessive pied chicks in a clutch or 2 :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks. If the female isn't split for recessive Pied what would the chicks be if he was bred with a Albino Female?
 

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Thank you. My male does have a yellow spot on the back of his head.
I just looked back through the thread... are you talking about the dominant pied male in the pics or do you have another male with a small pied spot? The male you posted pics of in this thread has a pied spot on his head because he is a dominant pied. It is of course possible he is split for recessive, but that pied spot is from the dominant pied :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Yeah its that male. I love his coloring. I hope I could get chicks that look like him. I not breeding this pair until next year so its early but this is one of my favorite pairs and I'm anxious to know what I could possibly get in a clutch.
 
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