Talk Budgies Forums banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,557 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If a hen has cinnamon markings she either got it from her father or grandfather correct?

Same with spangle because both are dominant?

And only a male can pass it onto chicks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
458 Posts
Yep. If a hen is Cinnamon then she got the gene from her dad. (who would either have to be Cinnamon himself or split for it). It's a sex-linked gene.

No about Spangle though. Spangle is dominant, therefore if you have a Spangle baby one of the parents had to be Spangle, it doesn't matter which one, mother or father. No bird can be split for Spangle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,767 Posts
It would definately come from the father as hens cannot get sex linked genes from their mother. Hens will pass their cinnamon gene on to all sons and none of their daughters. Spangle is different in that it can be passed to either son or daughter as it is not sex linked, and because it is a dominant gene it cannot be hidden either (and therefore must have come from one of her parents).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,557 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Neither of her parents were cinammon so her father would have been split since her fathers mother was cinnamon, corret?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,140 Posts
Neither of her parents were cinammon so her father would have been split since her fathers mother was cinnamon, corret?
Somewhat correct - It would be better to say that neither are visiable cinnamons. Cinnamon is on the female gene so the **** is split for cinnamon and all his daughters will be cinnamon. Cinnamon chicks hatch out with red eyes that will darken in a few days - so if your checking the nest box daily you can count the hens as they hatch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,557 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Somewhat correct - It would be better to say that neither are visiable cinnamons. Cinnamon is on the female gene so the **** is split for cinnamon and all his daughters will be cinnamon. Cinnamon chicks hatch out with red eyes that will darken in a few days - so if your checking the nest box daily you can count the hens as they hatch.
Wow very helpful. Thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,767 Posts
For a **** to be split cinnamon either its father was a cinnamon and its mother a normal, or the mother was a cinnamon and the father was normal (or split cinnamon). If the **** birds mother in this case was cinnamon he is definately split for it, which also explains why the hen you have is cinnamon.

Kerry I don't get what you mean about cinnamon being on the female gene? Cinnamon is on the X chromosome, of which males have two and females have one (one X and one Y, requiring only one sex linked X gene to be visual for sex linked mutations). Also a **** bird split for cinnamon will not produce all cinnamon females, he will produce 50% normal and 50% cinnamon as he has one normal X and one cinnamon carrying X gene, of which there is a purely 50/50 chance of passing on either one to any of his chicks regardless of gender.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,273 Posts
dean has it correct.

you are right that the father must have been split and he got the gene from his mother. a cinnamon hen is Xcin/Y = X chromosome with the cinnamon gene from her dad, and the Y chromosome from her mum....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,557 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
cinnamon). If the **** birds mother in this case was cinnamon he is definately split for it, which also explains why the hen you have is cinnamon.
And based on that, a hen can transfer cinnamon genes to her hen chicks, right?!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,767 Posts
Nope, remember above I said hens only have one X and one Y chromosome. So for any chicks to be hens, they obviously got a Y chromosome instead of an X from the hen, therefore she will always pass on her X to sons only, and her Y to daughters only.

So a sex linked hen will never ever pass the gene on to her daughters and ALWAYS pass it on to her sons. What I said before was it is obvious the cinnamon grandmother passed her cinnamon gene on to her SON (the father) who then passed it to his daughter who will then pass it to all her sons and so on and so forth :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,557 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
;) LOL and I thought I was smart and got it that time! Well good news anyhow maybe I'll get some cinnamon males. This stuff is hard for me to understand, it gets so confuse in my head! :eek: But I'm copying this to word so I have it. Appreciate your patience!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,273 Posts
no your hen can give the cinnamon gene to sons or daughters!

a cinnamon hen cannot give her cinnamon gene to her daughters... heres why:

a budgie has only two sex gene.
the male is X/X
the hen is X/Y

for a budgie to be a hen she must get a Y chromosome, which can only come from her mother. so she gets X from her dad and Y from her mum.

all sex linked genes are found on the X chromosome. so a hen can only get cinnamon from the parent who gave her the X chromosome = her father

a **** bird (X/X) can get a cinnamon gene from either parent as both parents give him an X chromosome.

a **** bird can give only give X chromosomes to his chicks so he can potentially give an X chromosome with the cinnamon gene to either sons or daughters. so your hen will give a cinnamon gene to her sons but he can then give it to any of his chicks regardless of sex. the only limiting factor on receiving sex linked genes from parents is the Y chromosome.

does that make sense? i am happy to try again if i have made it more confusing!!!
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top