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First chick – opaline cobalt (can’t see if it has a yellow face or not)
Chick 2 – yellow face opaline cobalt
Chick 3 – yellow face opaline cobalt
Chick 4 – opaline dilute (looks grey)
 

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First chick - opaline cobalt (can't see if it has a yellow face or not)
Chick 2 - yellow face opaline cobalt
Chick 3 - yellow face opaline cobalt
Chick 4 - opaline dilute (looks grey)
Elsabe,
My 1st reaction was "Wow!"..these are beautiful birds...I especially like the "4th" (maybe chick 3 rather; far-right in 2nd pic) chick!

Are these all siblings and from the same nest?

..the "2nd-from-left" baby (in pic 2; same as in pic 4) looks the same as far-right baby in pic 1, so I guess that makes the "chick 4" Nev refer to being chick 3, and thus only 4 chicks in total - the 4th being in pic3?!..whatever!

#...I agree with Nev, except maybe with the "2nd-to-last" baby (pic 2, far-right)?...isn't it an opaline dilute greywing (or is that what Nev meant by "looks grey"?)...

...whilst 4th chick (pic 3) do appear "opaline"...but the mantle on the neck isn't that evident...I guess the body colour in the wing-markings confirms the opaline gene as certainty...I considered this "neck mantle" to be body coloured, if Opaline....is this correct Nev?

# Will the grey always be "washed-out" such as in this example of 3rd chick (pic 2-far-right) ?....even if "Grey" is a dominant gene over "dilute"....I thought the "grey" wouldn't be affected that much?

thx, and stay well!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Jaco,
1st = white face opaline cobalt
2nd = yellow face opaline cobalt
3rd = yellow face opaline cobalt
4th = opaline dilute grey?

all Cody and Purdey's chicks - see other mutation thread for them.

what are their mutations?

one of the other TB members question the 4th chick?

regards
Elsabé
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
First chick - opaline cobalt (can't see if it has a yellow face or not)
Chick 2 - yellow face opaline cobalt
Chick 3 - yellow face opaline cobalt
Chick 4 - opaline dilute (looks grey)
Thanks Neville, did you have a look how the parents mutations are?
 

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Jaco,
1st = white face opaline cobalt
2nd = yellow face opaline cobalt
3rd = yellow face opaline cobalt
4th = opaline dilute grey?

all Cody and Purdey's chicks - see other mutation thread for them.

what are their mutations?

one of the other TB members question the 4th chick?

regards
Elsabé
thx Elsabe...for clarifying...

..."chucks it must be my eye-sight!"...only now noticed the chick no's in the original picture names..

Wonder if Nev has an answer on chick no4, whether it has just "grey addition" or "greywing"..it looks (refer grey-flights) to me like it has the latter gene as well?..

They look great...which of these will you be keeping?
jacodk
 

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#...I agree with Nev, except maybe with the "2nd-to-last" baby (pic 2, far-right)?...isn't it an opaline dilute greywing (or is that what Nev meant by "looks grey"?)...
What Nev means is the chick is an opaline dilute and its body color looks grey. Grey is a color-adding factor that usually overrides the blue body color (http://www.***************/colorsguide.html#greyfactor). Sometimes it's hard to tell the body color of dilutes because the color is too diluted. If Owlet's bird's body color is not grey, it's blue.

A bird is either dilute or greywing, not both (http://www.***************/colorsguide.html#dilution).
 

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What Nev means is the chick is an opaline dilute and its body color looks grey. Grey is a color-adding factor that usually overrides the blue body color (http://www.***************/colorsguide.html#greyfactor). Sometimes it's hard to tell the body color of dilutes because the color is too diluted. If Owlet's bird's body color is not grey, it's blue.

A bird is either dilute or greywing, not both (http://www.***************/colorsguide.html#dilution).
Thx for the reminder Susan (Nev),

So the answer to my question is that despite the "grey colour adding factor" being present the "dilute" still "washes-out" the body colour by 80%....interesting that such a recessive gene can "over-ride" a dominant gene (factor) in this manner...

See & speak again!
 

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...sorry, to "drag-this-out"!

...but a further question...==>

If Mauve (DF Blues), Greys or even Cobalts (SF Blues) have the "dilute" gene present...
...how do you distinguish between them body colours...if all are "lightly coloured"....(I guess the same difficulty "in principle" holds for the dark-green and olive "yellow-birds)

Can you assist ito of listing those other features, then being present, that a person needs to relates to...to determine the body colour?

Maybe viewing each bird "in person" (vs photos) is the best and sure way to tell?
Thanks again,
jdk
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
What Nev means is the chick is an opaline dilute and its body color looks grey. Grey is a color-adding factor that usually overrides the blue body color (http://www.***************/colorsguide.html#greyfactor). Sometimes it's hard to tell the body color of dilutes because the color is too diluted. If Owlet's bird's body color is not grey, it's blue.

A bird is either dilute or greywing, not both (http://www.***************/colorsguide.html#dilution).
Susan, thank you! did you check the mutations of Cody and Purdey?
 

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Thx for the reminder Susan (Nev),

So the answer to my question is that despite the "grey colour adding factor" being present the "dilute" still "washes-out" the body colour by 80%....interesting that such a recessive gene can "over-ride" a dominant gene (factor) in this manner...

See & speak again!
Not exactly. "Override" means cover up, not dominate in the genetic sense.
 
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