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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've noticed this "brown" from the very beginning but didn't think it would mean anything, and I've seen quite a few greywings around but none has this "browning" near the greyish stripes.

And since Cinnamon is a sex linked mutation, a greywing could also inherit it but will show the dominant Greywing stripes or both?

It doesn't show up that well in pictures (like Vanilla's red eyes appeared black in her pictures) but there is browning.

I hope you can see at least a bit of it in the picture below.

 

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I think his body color is too bright to be a cinnamon bird. Cinnamons have a diluted by %50 (I think) body color. Could be a full body color greywing. Can you post a pic of his front in natural light with no flash?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think his body color is too bright to be a cinnamon bird. Cinnamons have a diluted by %50 (I think) body color. Could be a full body color greywing. Can you post a pic of his front in natural light with no flash?
I know that he is a Full Bodied Greywing Violet Cobalt...so he should have Clearwing and Greywing genes.

But my concern is the browning in the wing stripes with the grey. I wonder if you could see that in the picture.

And as far as I know, Cinnamon markings aren't visible on greywing's, as if Greywing masks cinnamon...

But I've always seen this browning in his stripes since he was young...thought they;d go away after his first moult.

Winter has gone through 2 moults and these brown markings remain.

And I haven't seen this browning on any other greywing either, not even on my female Greywing Skyblue.

So I was wondering if this is normal with Greywings or could be Cinnamon showing slightly.
 

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Yes greywings can have brownish wing markings, it is a fault. I agree with Erin he is too bright to be a cinnamon he is just a full body greywing :)

Greywing cinnamons often look simalar to dilutes from the ones I have seen and are very diluted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes greywings can have brownish wing markings, it is a fault. I agree with Erin he is too bright to be a cinnamon he is just a full body greywing :)

Greywing cinnamons often look simalar to dilutes from the ones I have seen and are very diluted.
Thank you. That clears it up.

By the way, I've often heard the term "fault" being used with regards to mutations, what does that really imply?
 

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Thank you. That clears it up.

By the way, I've often heard the term "fault" being used with regards to mutations, what does that really imply?
Sure thing :)

A fault is something that a mutation should not have but you see in a particular bird and that you do not want to breed. Each mutation has a standard that it should meet, but when a bird does not meet this standard like for example a greywing having brown markings when they should be only grey, it is isnt desirable.

When showing birds if a bird does not meet this standard and has a fault it will be penalized for them. Other examples are suffusion in inos DF spangles and DECs, clearings with dark grey markings, birds with no throat spots, body color mixed in with Wong and head stripes with non opalines, things along those lines that we shout try to eliminate when pairing our birds :)

Always trying to breed as closely to the standard for each mutation helps protects mutations from disappearing from poor breeding :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·


Sure thing :)

A fault is something that a mutation should not have but you see in a particular bird and that you do not want to breed. Each mutation has a standard that it should meet, but when a bird does not meet this standard like for example a greywing having brown markings when they should be only grey, it is isnt desirable.

When showing birds if a bird does not meet this standard and has a fault it will be penalized for them. Other examples are suffusion in inos DF spangles and DECs, clearings with dark grey markings, birds with no throat spots, body color mixed in with Wong and head stripes with non opalines, things along those lines that we shout try to eliminate when pairing our birds :)

Always trying to breed as closely to the standard for each mutation helps protects mutations from disappearing from poor breeding :)
But doesn't that increase variation in the mutations?

For example, the browning in Winter's stripes look great to me...gives him a distinct appearance too!

Thanks for the clarification :)
 

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Just because the brown in Winter's stripes are a "fault," it doesn't mean that he is not attractive. All show-type animals -- dogs, cats, horses, and, yes, budgies -- are said to have faults if they do not meet the standards set by the judging society.

Simply put, Winter is not a show-caliber budgie. The fact doesn't make him any less wonderful, however. Not every human has the features, height, and weight to be a super model; the same is true of budgies.
 

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But doesn't that increase variation in the mutations?

For example, the browning in Winter's stripes look great to me...gives him a distinct appearance too!

Thanks for the clarification :)
No it does not really increase variety, but rather ruins the mutation in the end. If people start breeding brown into greywings on purpose, we will soon loose the greywing mutation and will end up with something that looks like a cinnamon. We already have those, so why ruin the greywing mutation :)
 
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