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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Very sadly, Quincy, who was 9, has had to be put to sleep. He stopped flying gradually, but it became obvious that he had something amiss with his oil gland. The vet confirmed it was a tumour and said that for surgery to succeed it would need a general anaesthetic and she thought it highly unlikely he would survive that. the alternative was a local and treatment with antibiotics for associated infection and then probably a gradual return of the tumour. I agreed that it was best to put him down, I have just got home. We now have only one budgie left, who is also 9. My question is, should I show Frank Quincy's body or not? They were not bonded ( no preening involved, for example) unlike Frank and his best pal Louis, who died about 18 months ago. I've read that it can help them grieve, but just wanted to run this by the experts here.

Many thanks for your thoughts.
 

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So sorry for your loss.馃尮 It's hard to say whether letting the surviving bird see the body has any effect. I have done it, but not always. I just hold the deceased bird in my hand as the others look on, only in one instance was there any interaction, one of a very bonded pair died and when he saw his buddies body he preened it :cry:.
Fly high sweet Quincy馃晩
 

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I personally have never shown the deceased body of any of my budgies to the other.
I see no reason to do so.

I'm very sorry for your loss of Quincy.
Fly high and soar freely sweet Quincy; rest peacefully now wee man.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for this, really helpful, I've read various bits of advice elsewhere, but I really value the Talk budgies wisdom. I haven't shown him Quincy thus far, he seems to be reasonably settled, doing his usual nibble session he does on the run up to bed time. I suspect he realised Quincy was not OK, I mean he hadn't flown for weeks, that's pretty obvious and noticeably problem I would think.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes, and when they are ill they usually keep themselves away from the other birds, in my experience. Quincy didn't feel ill I don't think, though it was, of course, obvious he couldn't fly any more. I have a feeling that Frank, like me, was preparing himself for the worst already. I don't feel as devastated as I have before, when a much loved pet dies. I knew it was the right thing to do. Being disabled and not able to fly, as long as he was comfortable and happy, which he seemed to be felt acceptable. Having a tumour growing which would only get bigger, likely infected and uncomfortable ( and there was evidence it was begging to bother him) was not, to me, kind. Frank and I are both doing OK today. He has sat with me, he's enjoying his treats and shouting as he usually does, at the wild birds on the bird feeders outside the window. No flock calling, which he did so much when his beloved friend Louis died, thankfully. I'm in the garden a bit this afternoon, need to prepare a spot for Quincy near his late flock - with suitable shrub with bright yellow flowers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Frank is doing OK, as am I. His behaviour doesn't seem unusual, which is a relief. I've tried to send as much time with him as possible - though he doesn't necessarily want to sit with me, I think it helps to be in the room with him.
 
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