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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm killing time until I have to put my kids to bed

I'm on *************** - reading on different things

I did not even know a Double Factor Clear Flight Pied was possible i just thought if you put 2 visuals together then you'd just get more Clear Flight pieds

but according to this nope you get Double Factor But I can't find any where if it says they'd look different than a Single Factor

Genetics of Clearflight Pied Summary:
Clearflight Pied - dominant
Normal - recessive
The inheritance pattern of clearflight pied is the same as dominant pied. However, clearflight pied is unrelated to either dominant pied or recessive pied, and a budgie can have any combination of the three pieds at the same time. There are only two alleles for clearflight pied: the normal gene and the clearflight pied gene. The clearflight pied gene is completely dominant to the recessive normal gene. This means that a single-factor clearflight pied looks the same as the double-factor clearflight pied. Here, we will represent the clearflight pied gene as "P" and the normal gene as "p". Therefore there are three possible genetic combinations for any budgie:

  • pp - Two normal genes (homozygous) resulting in a normal budgie.
  • Pp - One clearflight pied gene and one normal gene (heterozygous) resulting in a visually clearflight pied budgie that is single-factor.
  • PP - Two clearflight pied genes (homozygous) resulting in a visually clearflight pied budgie that is double-factor.
http://www.***************/gen_clearflight.html

if it is possible I have at least one (Gabriel) but he looks like all my other Clear Flight pieds
 

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Hi. I'm trying to learn. What exactly does "double factor" mean.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi. I'm trying to learn. What exactly does "double factor" mean.
Means it has 2 copies of the gene

Like a double Factor Spangle - means it got the Spangle Gene from both mom and dad - but with them you can tell the difference between double factor and single factor- Double factor looks Identical to a Albino (in blue series) or a Lutino (in green series) only they don't have red eyes, they also get iris rings,But color wise they're pure white or Pure yellow with no markings

but I've never heard any one call a clear flight pied a Double Factor - didn't even know it was possible just thought it was called a Clear Flight pied when both parents are Clear Flight pieds

like with Recessive pied you don't call them Double Factor Recessive Pied its just Recessive pied even when both parents are recessive pied
 

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Thanks. I'm keeping notes for myself on how to tell what from what. I get overwhelmed sometimes and then I don't know one from the other.
 

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Any gene could technically be double factor because you can always have one copy or 2. Sometimes 2 copies looks different and sometimes it doesn't but in both cases you could call it a double factor. If we wanted to we could call a mauve a double factor dark factor and I've seen some sites use double dark factor for some species of bird instead of a specific color name. I've actually never seen DF and SF used in animal genetics until this site and a few other pet bird (not poultry) genetics sites. People with more genetic knowledge generally just used homozygous and heterozygous where people without would type out/say the animal had both copies or only one.

It says right in the info you pasted up there
This means that a single-factor clearflight pied looks the same as the double-factor clearflight pied.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Any gene could technically be double factor because you can always have one copy or 2. Sometimes 2 copies looks different and sometimes it doesn't but in both cases you could call it a double factor. If we wanted to we could call a mauve a double factor dark factor and I've seen some sites use double dark factor for some species of bird instead of a specific color name. I've actually never seen DF and SF used in animal genetics until this site and a few other pet bird (not poultry) genetics sites. People with more genetic knowledge generally just used homozygous and heterozygous where people without would type out/say the animal had both copies or only one.

It says right in the info you pasted up there
ha I didn't even see that part! and I read that thing at least 4 times :p
 
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