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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, all. I've been having concerns about my new baby boy, Morty. He has been home a month today, and is housed in the same cage as Kenora. They get along pretty well.

Since the first day he was home, he's been a huge puff ball, to the point he literally looked like a ball. He sleeps way more than I know a budgie should, and his "naps" are for long durations. Kenora is just so active, chirping and yelling and jumping and dancing and playing all the time, but he just sleeps.

He does eat, and he eats well. He's a bit chubby, haha. He eats mostly seed, however the past week, at least, I've been incorporating pellets into their diet as well, and am trying a new brand the past two days (Harrison's). And he gets some millet every other day, too.

There are only a few toys he's shown interest in, but he doesn't play with them as enthusiastically as Kenny does. She's a nut, though!

His poop is a pale khaki colour, and I think it's a little bit softer (not liquidy, though) than Kenny's normal poops. At one point his poop was normal though, a few days after I brought him home, they looked just fine. For the first few days he wasn't eating so his feces were bright green and very liquidy.

HERE'S THE THING: He's been to the vet, just two days ago. She did a fecal smear and test and nothing came back concerning. His eyes are bright, his feet seem circulated, he's aware, etc. The exam went really well and she said he looks quite normal. BUT she did agree with me that his lack of energy and puffiness isn't normal budgie behaviour, and so he's on a round of antibiotics right now to see if that clears anything he may have. We did not do a blood test as she said we wouldn't unless really necessary, since taking even a drop too much could be fatal.

My question for you more experienced budgie owners is...what do you think this is? Do you think he's even sick, or just an oddly lazy bird? 'Cause it could just be him. But I have this sinking feeling something is truly wrong.

THANK YOU in advance, everyone!
 

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Did you take Monty to a regular vet or an Avian Vet?
Your comment about a drop of blood too much leads me to assume it was a regular vet.
An Avian Vet should be able to do a blood test by cutting a nail too short, niking the "quick" and then staunching the blood flow as soon as s/he had a drop of blood.

Avian Vets have special training to determine the cause of symptoms resulting from illness or trauma. This is important as "regular" vets will often overlook symptoms that are quickly obvious to an Avian Vet.
When you rely on anyone who has not had training in Avian diagnosis and care, you may be delaying effective treatment. This can prolong suffering that may be avoidable.
The bird will often require a more intense, prolonged treatment with a poorer chance of full recovery than it would have if you seek prompt professional diagnosis and treatment at the first sign of illness.

Distinction between an Avian Vet and a Vet that "Will See Birds"

It concerns me that the vet put Monty on a course of anti-biotics without an actual diagnosis of a bacterial infection as well.
http://talkbudgies.com/articles-budgie-disease-illness/104375-antibiotics-arent-always-answer.html

Do you use ACV as a natural pro-biotic for your budgies?
http://talkbudgies.com/articles-holistic-natural-remedies/103936-apple-cider-vinegar.html

My personal feeling is that unless you saw an Avian Vet and are really pleased with the individual and his/her treatment of your budgie, I would seek a second opinion.

http://talkbudgies.com/articles-general-budgie-info/340410-avian-physical-examination.html

 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
FaeryBee and Therm, I did take him to an avian/exotic veterinarian. She explained to me that the lab needs a minimum of 3mm of blood, and to take that much from a budgie can be tricky because if more than that is taken it can be very dangerous to the bird. I do trust this vet, as she helped me months ago when Kenora broke a blood feather.

She said it's possible he has an early respiratory infection or something of the like, and is hoping the antibiotics will help. After ten days of taking the medicine, we're supposed to go from there.
 

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Did you take Monty to a regular vet or an Avian Vet?
Your comment about a drop of blood too much leads me to assume it was a regular vet.
An Avian Vet should be able to do a blood test by cutting a nail too short, niking the "quick" and then staunching the blood flow as soon as s/he had a drop of blood.

Avian Vets have special training to determine the cause of symptoms resulting from illness or trauma. This is important as "regular" vets will often overlook symptoms that are quickly obvious to an Avian Vet.
When you rely on anyone who has not had training in Avian diagnosis and care, you may be delaying effective treatment. This can prolong suffering that may be avoidable.
The bird will often require a more intense, prolonged treatment with a poorer chance of full recovery than it would have if you seek prompt professional diagnosis and treatment at the first sign of illness.

Distinction between an Avian Vet and a Vet that "Will See Birds"

It concerns me that the vet put Monty on a course of anti-biotics without an actual diagnosis of a bacterial infection as well.
http://talkbudgies.com/articles-budgie-disease-illness/104375-antibiotics-arent-always-answer.html

Do you use ACV as a natural pro-biotic for your budgies?
http://talkbudgies.com/articles-holistic-natural-remedies/103936-apple-cider-vinegar.html

My personal feeling is that unless you saw an Avian Vet and are really pleased with the individual and his/her treatment of your budgie, I would seek a second opinion.

http://talkbudgies.com/articles-general-budgie-info/340410-avian-physical-examination.html

Shouldn't a sick budgie be quarantine from the other budgie in the flock?
I'm just wondering.
 

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Any new budgie even a healthy looking one should always be quarantined when new.
I agree with Deborah's (FaeryBee) post, and they were my exact thoughts too. I don't want to insult you if you are comfortable with this particular avian vet, but again, Deborah's post took all the thoughts right out of my mind ;). How about getting a second opinion? I hope your little one will be okay. He sure is pretty.

Let me also add, even some exotics and avian vets aren't the best. I'm saying this in a general sense. I've had misdiagnosis before, and while what she had was deadly, I sure wish it had been accurately diagnosed sooner and without seeing an additional specialist and spending even more. Not all avian vets are 'good' at treating birds unfortunately.
 

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I truly hope you can find a good Bird vet to it checked out soon.poor sweetie might be sick or something.sending healing and comforting prayers for your sweet budgie.blessings and we're here for you.I know it's stressful having to watch and be concerned for your loved one.hopefully it will be ok real soon.
 

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Good luck with Morty and finding a good vet for a second opinion. There's nothing wrong with getting a second opinion even if you like your vet ;).

To be more efficient, the new vet is going to need the records from the other vet sent over, so they can review what they did already in terms of testing and treatment, etc. and see the vets notes to get a better idea of what is going on.
 

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Excessive

As above comments, please see a second opinion from an avian vet. Please use the info above on what to look for when a vet examines a bird. I do not hold with abusing a bird but there are ways to take blood for lab tests. It is a way of controlling you to make you fear a blood test. I have handled hundreds of budgies and other birds and a drop or two is not likely to kill a budgie shock from being handled could if the bird is never handled. It is really important to get a bird to accept being handled at the vet or you will never get your moneys worth. Vet visits are expensive. If the bird is flighty many vets will not handle them for fear of shock and death. Could this be the reason behind no blood work. How much experience does this vet have with small birds? I would not tell the vet till exam is over as the two vets could be friends. Get an untainted Dx. Ask about a crop swab looking for fungal organisms. Fecals do not always catch AGY See Stickys above disease and illness and expect and watch for a full exam ask questions and take notes make a copy and be sure beak and GI are covered Also parasites can cause a bird to be ill. Your Bird should have been in quarantine for 30 to 45 days be ready to have the other bird treated. There are labs that you can send blood to with out the vet involved. Do not let a vet intimidate you because the may be weak in an area of treatment. Budgies and 'tiels are among the most birds seen in a vets office. We some times clip a nail and get a bit of blood but we have several clotting substances from flour to the steptic granules or stick that is applied to the tip of a nail to clot. Please do not get caught in fear. Be firm and apply proper clotting agent. If you do not have a first aid kit start one. There is a lot of info on first aid kits in the stickys . When you educate yourself you will be less afraid. Windy city Parrot has some basics to start a kit in a first aid section. Use tools that are small bird size like forceps or tweezers rather than pliers etc. Blanket antibiotic use is not the best answer in many cases especially if it is a combo bacteria and fungal issue or if it is a parasite. Bless you and your budgies and please keep us informed of progress. Jo Ann:Love birds::Love birds:
 

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If he is a young bird, this sleeping is not normal. If he is an old bird, it could be acceptable if he is really old. The puffiness is normal if it is very cold, if it is not, it is not normal. If the wrong answers come from reading this, thake him to an avian vet for a real check out. They can spot things that a regular person cannot no matter how many bird health books they read.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I will keep everyone updated, and thanks for all of your concerns.

So today is day 3 of Morty's antibiotics. He gets a dose (very small) twice a day, and this is supposed to go on for ten days unless the vet says to continue it.

I have decided at this point not to find a second opinion, as he seems to be responding to the medication. The vet did say, because he also had slight bobbing of his tail, that it's possibly an upper respiratory infection, which I failed to mention initially. So she didn't completely blindly give him antibiotics.

What I've noticed today is that he is definitely not nearly as puffy anymore. He used to be so puffed up he was literally a sphere. Now it's just a content amount of puffiness and looks much, much healthier than before. It does not concern me like before. Now I can actually see the real shape of his belly instead of just poof.

He still sleeps a lot, but I've noticed it's most heavy in the morning and early afternoon, and then he wakes up a bit more.

He was very alert today. He seems to be slimmer (in regards to his feathers, not weight), and he's more aware of me and my movements. However, at the same time, he's more interested in being tamed now than he was before. So while he's still nervous, he responds better now that I think he's starting to feel better.
 

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Excessive

Birds who are ill usually need extra heat source like a ceramic heat lamp found in the reptile area of pet stores also carried by Lady Gouldian finch. 60 watt and ceramic fixture base and a reflector. The bird will fluff up if it is chilled. If bird eats properly it produces fuel to keep the birds body warm. It is good to hear your bird is better. Many times you can hear crinkling in breathing if you hold bird next to your ear, You will hear heart beat and breathing. The crinkling sound indicates respiratory infection. Best wishes, Jo Ann :Love birds::Love birds:
 

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Having the additional information that the vet suspected a respiratory infection provides better reasoning for the administration of antibiotics.

Thank you for letting us know that important element was overlooked in your initial post.

I'm glad to hear little Monty is showing improvement now and wish him a full and speedy recovery! :hug:

To all members:

When seeing an Avian Vet - please take notes of all the instructions you are given so nothing is overlooked.

If you ask for advice on the forum and we are not provided with all pertinent facts, we cannot offer logical suggestions.

The information provided on the forum should not substitute for professional medical advice provided by an experienced and qualified Avian Vet.
 

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Jade,

I hope you're able to get a second opinion on little Morty's condition! He's very sweet, and I'm sure soon he'll fell much better. Glad the antibiotics seem to be helping so far, and may they continue to do so :fingerx:

Keep us posted, and get well soon, little Morty! :p
 
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