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The Kangaroo Whisperer
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Hey guys!

I was on this boring car ride and I was thinking my genetics over. I was thinking of original and the two separate colors that produce ours today.

First of I was thinking that a bird either has a base colour of blue or green. But then how would we get Ino's? How can a yellow or white bird have a base colour of green or blue. So I came to a conclusion. If a normal green budgie has a yellow head and a normal blue one has a white head. If I gave an example of a dominant pied. you never see green on a white pied bird. Always blue. So then if a bird was a yellow pied then it is likely to have green on it.
Yellow-base - dominant
White-base - recessive

So does that mean the base colours are yellow and white? What about Violet? Would its base be white? Because of a WF and the Violet colour is more blue. But what about the YF Violets?

I got this from a site:
Yellowface budgies are in between yellow-based budgies and white-based budgies.

But how come they are not a yellow based bird? And in the 'ino' variety , a mix of albino and lutino can be seen as a "creamio" colored bird...So what would Its base colour be?
Picture of an Ino:
http://www.***************/v_yellowfaceino2.jpg

I really need alot of help from the genetic gurus!
 

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From my understanding of it-
I also refer to it as either the white base or the yellow base.
Violet effects both bases I believe, I am quite sure you can get violet mauve and dark greens etc. Dont quote me on that as I could be wrong. Violet may only affect the white but Im sure I've heard of a violet dark green.
Creaminos are yellowface albinos. They are white based, with the yellowface gene added - causing them to be creaminos. But its still a white based bird, even though the yf gene has been added.

I am quite often wrong and happy to be corrected but I am fairly confident.
 

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Green budgies are yellow based and blue budgies are white based. An albino or a lutino has the pigment removed and you're just left with the base colour. There is disagreement about yellow face blues, they are sometimes called par blues. They are not yellow based because you can't breed a green from them without introducing the yellow from the other partner but they're not truely white based either. Violet and grey are colour adding factors and they can be added to either group of birds but they are harder to see on some shades
 

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Seems pretty much covered but i'll add my little splurge.

Budgies are (or were) all yellow based genetically speaking. They all have the yellow enzyme producing genes. Im not going to try and rummage up dates, but over CAPTIVE history, there have been mutations in that gene that reduced its ability to produce yellow properly. In the presence of one faulty gene, the other fully functional gene is still able to produce full strength yellow so visually there is no way to tell that the bird was carrying this faulty gene. (This being what we would today refer to as a green bird split for blue)

I think initially budgies in captivity were colony bred (dont quote this as scripture, but i am quite sure in most cases they were colony bred). This means that faulty gene was passed on to siblings who either mated with eachother or their parents and produced a bird that had two yellow enzyme producing genes that couldnt produce yellow. So you're left with a white based bird. But since there are other colour producing genes, what you are left with is the blue and black pigments - a blue budgie. The green budgies produce blue and black exactly the same as 'blue' budgies, only they have the added yellow which we learn in primary school mixes to make green.

Later down the line new faults appeared on the same gene, but (for simplicities sake) these genes were only PARTIALLY faulty. So they produce a weak yellow in the face (yf1) or generally over the body (yf2) or a golden yellow (golden face) that is still slightly weaker than the fully functional and fully coloured yellow. We call these birds yellow faces, and as nev said, some people argue we should call the YF1 a creamface, and the YF2 and goldenfaces par blues.

This next part is very very butch - im drudging up very hazy memories here and i have to read up to be sure, but i think grey factor is basically a melanin altering gene? In ino's there is no blue or black colour, so there is no melanin to alter.

Violet works in a similar way, but i believe it also affects the base colour. So violet albiino's have a HINT of violet, or in some cases im told they appear 'pinkish'. Violet lutino's have a browny colour as far as i know. But again this is only a slight change in colour. Im trying to breed violet ino's.
 
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