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Here is my new addition to the flock. I have never seen this mutation before and I just had to have her. Ginger is a normal green cinnamon budgie.

Correct me if I'm wrong the cinnamon gene is sex linked. This means when this hen breeds with a normal male the female chicks will not have any cinnamon genes. About half of the male chicks on the other hand will carry the cinnamon gene. You will not be able to see the cinnamon on the male chicks they will just carry the gene.

It will take a few generations to actually see the cinnamon gene. I'm going to breed Ginger with a normal male. Hopefully getting a male chick. Then I will most likely breed Ginger with the male chick. Isn't this a sure way to breed cinnamons? Is there a better way to breed them so they aren't so closely related?

I would also like to know what **** to breed Ginger with? Here are the choices.

#1 Name: Jazz
Appearance: Normal green
Hidden genes: Grey wing, clearwing, blue

#2 Name: Willow
Appearance: Normal yellow face type two sky blue
Hidden genes: opaline, mauve, recessive pied, white face

#3 Name: Kingsley
Appearance: Normal violet
Hidden genes:

#4 Name: Pippa
Appearance: Normal sky blue
Hidden genes: Cobalt blue, grey wing, opaline,recessive pied, yellow face

#5 Name: Zeus (English Budgie)
Appearance: Spangle clbalt blue opaline
Hidden genes:

#6 Name: Diego
Appearance: (Rainbow) Yellow face type two blue series opaline clear wing diminant pied with a recessive spot on his head
Hidden genes: Recessive pied

Here are some photos of Ginger




 

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Ginger looks more like a dark green cinnamon (or olive not sure which). You are right about the cinnamon being sex linked. I would not breed son to mother though. That can have bad effects on any chicks. Im sure someone else will be along soon to explain line breeding better than I can though. Linebreeding is a lot safer than Inbreeding.
 

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If she is bred to a normal male all the male chicks will be split for Cinnamon. If you want Cinnamon chicks, then simply breed one of her males to any female, and you will get 50% of the female chicks being Cinnamon, and half of the males split for it. It's not good to inbreed them, mother to son, though that (or getting another Cinnamon female) would be the only way of getting both male and female Cinnamons.
 

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If you breed her to a normal male, all her male chicks will be split for cinnamon. Those males will have a chance of producing one female cinnamon out of every 4 chicks hatched.

What i would do is hope to breed two males from this hen. Breed each of those males to unrelated females and produce cinnamon hens. You could theoretically then take one hen from each of those pairings and then mate them back to the uncle. That would be one step down in relation from pairing a son back to a mother.
 

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With your birds..mate your Cinnamon to a normal male, all the male chicks will be split for Cinnamon. You should do Guthwolf's advice and mate her to two different males. Then you'll get a couple Cinnamon hens if you mate the resulting male chicks to any normal female. Mate the Cinnamon hens from that pairing to a split Cinnamon male and you'll get both male and female Cinnamons. That's about 4 generations but that's how you can get a male Cinnamon from your girl.
 

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Your hen is cinnamon olive or possibly cinnamon grey green. Bred to a normal all her male chicks will be split for cinnamon. Breeding one of these male chicks to a cinnamon hen will produce about 50% cinnamons of both sexes. To breed one back to his own mother would be just be asking for trouble because the relationship is too close, but to breed the way the Dean has suggested should be all right
 

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Sorry if i wasnt clear - the breeding plan i suggest was the quickest way to get a cinnamon male with the final pairings that arent too closely related. Hope that helps.

Like this:

Pair one
Cinnamon hen X Normal male

Desired offpsring: Cinnamon Split Male 1 & Cinnamon Split Male 2

Pairing two and three (Following breeding season)

Cinnamon Split Male 1 X Normal Hen (unrelated to the male or the other hen)

Desired offspring: Cinnamon Hen Niece 1

&

Cinnamon Split Male 2 x Normal Hen)

Desired offspring: Cinnamon Hen Niece 2

Pairing three and four (Third breeding season)

Cinnamon Split Male 1 (same one as above) X Cinnamon Niece 2 (His brothers daughter)

&

Cinnamon Split Male 2 X Cinnamon Niece 1 (His brothers daughter)

Pairings 3 and four have will both produce 25% cinnamon males, 25% normal males split cinnamon, 25% cinnamon females, 25% normal females.
 
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