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I have a clutch that has me puzzled. I thought that grey factor was dominant. so can some one explain this clutch to me please. Dusty is my male, he is a opaline, yellow face type two, grey violet split for cinnamon and maybe recessive pied. My female is Bell, she is a normal blue bot sure if she is split for anything. So I thought I would get...

100% opaline females
100% normal males
50% yellow face type two
50% white face
males split for cinnamon
maybe some recessive pieds
100%single factor violets
greys

Now I have four chicks from this pair. Three are normal blue with a white spot on their heads but the fourth is a normal yellow face type two grey. So can someone just explain the grey gene. Maybe it's so obvious I don't get it.
Thanks


 

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Are you wondering why you didn't get more greys because of it being a dominant gene? If so... Grey is dominant but that doesn't mean ALL chicks will be grey. From what I have read you would expect 50% greys with one parent being grey.
 

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For some reason I thought grey factor worked like violet factor. But it being dominant makes more sense. Thanks
I'm not an expert so hopefully someone would confirm, but the violet is dominant too. So if one parent is violet then I think only half would inherit violet as well.?
 

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Here's a link to my violet questions. As you can see even if 2 parents are sf violet there is a 25% chance of no violet. I bring this up because you expected 100% sf violet.
 

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those results seem ok to me.

grey works a bit like violet in that it changes the base colour of the bird, and both of them are dominant genes.

so a grey bird is a blue bird with the grey gene, just like a violet bird is a blue bird with the violet gene.

in your example the grey bird is single factor so some chicks recieved no grey gene = blues, and one chick recieved a grey gene = grey. i really like yf greys too.

as far as the violet goes, youwould only expect 100% violets if the dad was a df violet, otherwise you would get some violets and some not, just like with the grey.

does that help?
 

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tonic,, let me see if I got your point,, with both sf a violet bred to grey could yield 50% blue (half from mom and half from dad), 25% violet and 25% grey??? I have just paired a violet spangle to a grey dom peid, chicks hatching as we speak, so I believe those are the colors I should expect.
 

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tonic,, let me see if I got your point,, with both sf a violet bred to grey could yield 50% blue (half from mom and half from dad), 25% violet and 25% grey??? I have just paired a violet spangle to a grey dom peid, chicks hatching as we speak, so I believe those are the colors I should expect.
firstly, all chicks will be blue series, so we can ignore that part, what you are really interested in is the result of the grey and violet genes...

so the cross would be:
- sf violet = Vv gg (V = violet, v = non violet, g = non grey)
- sf grey = vv Gg

so if each passes on one copy of each gene:
- the violet can pass on: V or v, and g or g.
- the grey can pass on: v or v, and G or g.

which we combine to get these possibilties:

- Vv gg = violet non grey
- Vv Gg = violet grey
- vv gg = non violet non grey (blue)
- vv Gg = non violet grey

so 25% each of violets, greys, blues, and violet greys
 
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