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Hi,
I recently took one of my budgies to the vet because she had some brown discharge above her cere. other than that everything is normal (shes eating, drinking, breathing normally, and fairly energetic) but I wanted to be safe. The vet ordered a test that showed signs of a possible bacterial upper respiratory infection so I'm starting her on antibiotics. At this time it was not recommend that I separate my two birds probably because gil is pretty much asymptomatic. However I know this might not be the case for any possible future problems. I was wondering what would be considered a reasonable size minimal size for a hospital/quarantine cage? I have a travel cage but its only 14.5 x 11 x 15.6 which feels small for any extended period of time.
Also I was sent directions on how to administer the meds by my vet but does anyone have any advice/tips to make both me and gil less freaked out by this? Shes happy to sit on my finger but anything other than that tends to end poorly. I haven't found that dimming the lights has been that helpful but it could be possible that im not making this dark enough.
My last question (and something I'm planning on asking the vet when I take gil back for a follow up) is could fumes potentially cause something like this? I've been very careful myself but it is the summer and some of my neighbors really like grilling and there have been a few times where I've been able to smell the smoke.
I know I probably seem paranoid this incident has just shaken me a bit
 

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Yes, charcoal fumes, expecially when lighter fluid is used to light the charcoal, can cause respiratory distress in your budgie. Any smoke or chemical fumes can be toxic for budgies delicate respiratory systems.

Wrapping your budgie in a small soft cloth and holding her upright when administering the medication by oral syringe will help.
Talk to her calmly as you are caring for her. Giving the medication when the room is dim and quiet is also helpful.
Giving your bird medication via oral syringe

The cage I use for acute illness is around the size of the one you indicated.

For extended illness treatments, I use one that is around 15”x 16” x 22”
 
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