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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I curious to know since some of the members here can do it with almost not trying. I really wanna understand genetics but I'm only 45% there.:S
 

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I understand sex-linked genes really well but the normal ones are confusing me, so can you tell me if I got this right or not:

****: Normal Green X Hen: Normal Blue Split for
Split for Violet:budgie: Recessive Pied

Would it be: 25% Normal, 25% Normal/Recessive Pied, 25% single factor violet or Green Normal/Violet, 25% Violet Split for Recessive Pied?
 

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You basically do a seperate punnet square for each mutation and then multiply the percentages against eachother.

So 2 blue parents of course have 100% blue chicks. Then there is a 50% chance of being either sex, so that 100% blue becomes 50% blue female, 50% blue male. Then if you want to throw in say.. yellow face (which is dominant, and if we deal with single factor yellowface then it also has a 50% chance to pass on so...) it would be 50% blue female, 50% blue male X 50% yellowface which is 25% blue male, 25% YF blue male, 25% blue female, 25% YF blue female. Then lets say dad is is split for opaline which is sex linked, this means he can produce opaline females and males that are split for opaline, and would just be multipled on top of EACH current chance becoming 12.5% blue male, 12.5% blue male split opaline, 12.5% YF blue male, 12.5% YF blue male split opaline, 12.5% blue female, 12.5% opaline blue female, 12.5% YF blue female, 12.5% YF opaline blue female.

Excuse the mess, but thats the basic way to do it. There are more complicated calculations out there that can give some slightly different answers for some of the recessive or harder to combine mutations, but the above is how you do it simply.
 

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I understand sex-linked genes really well but the normal ones are confusing me, so can you tell me if I got this right or not:

****: Normal Green Lets add one dark factor and say normal dark green **** X Hen: Normal Blue Split for
Split for Violet :budgie: Recessive Pied CANT BE SPLIT FOR VIOLET, so lets call her a Normal Single factor violet skyblue split for recessive pied

Would it be: 25% Normal, 25% Normal/Recessive Pied, 25% single factor violet or Green Normal/Violet, 25% Violet Split for Recessive Pied?
Also your example would be thus, remembering to deal with each mutation seperately ->

Gender:
50% male, 50% female

Base Colour:
Green/green **** X blue/blue hen = 100% green/blue chicks

Add them together so far, 50% green/blue males, 50% green/blue female

Violet factor:
50% single factor violet (from the mom), 50% chance of whatever the normal 'non violet' gene is from dad.

Add this to the mix by multiplying each existing percentage by the additional mutation (basically the chance is halved). So we now have 25% green/blue males, 25% SF violet green/blue males, 25% green/blue females, 25% SF violet green/blue females

Dark factor:
Dad has one dark factor and one 'normal' gene, mum has two normal genes. This means all chicks get one normal gene from mum (no dark factor) and a 50% chance to inherit either dads dark factor or normal (no dark factor) gene.

Now we have 12.5% LIGHT green/blue male (no dark factor), 12.5% green/blue male, 12.5% SF violet green/blue male, 12.5% SF violet LIGHT green/blue male, 12.5% green/blue female, 12.5% LIGHT green/blue female, 12.5% SF green/blue female, 12.5% SF LIGHT green/blue female

Recessive pied (single factor only, E.g passing it along in split form).
50% chance mum will pass this on, 50% chance she wont.

Add these in to get our final numbers for this pair:
6.25% LIGHT green/blue male (no dark factor)
6.25% LIGHT green/blue and recessive pied male (no dark factor)
6.25% green/blue male
6.25% green/blue and recessive pied male
6.25% SF violet green/blue male
6.25% SF violet green/blue and recessive pied male
6.25% SF violet LIGHT green/blue male
6.25% SF violet LIGHT green/blue and recessive pied male

6.25% green/blue female
6.25% green/blue and recessive pied female
6.25% LIGHT green/blue female
6.25% LIGHT green/blue and recessive pied female
6.25% SF green/blue female
6.25% SF green/blue and recessive pied female
6.25% SF LIGHT green/blue female
6.25% SF LIGHT green/blue and recessive pied female

Basically 6.25% chance means every 1 in 16 chicks will come out that particular way. Another way to look at it as there are 16 different possible combinations of chicks this pair could produce. That is if you consider male/female. If you exclude sex, there are only EIGHT variations you will see in the chicks genetically. You may never see one particular combination, you may see 10 exactly the same. They are just odds. However in most of my clutches I see the clutches follow calculations VERY closely. Hope this helps.
 

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****: Normal Green X Hen: Normal Blue Split for
Split for Violet:budgie: Recessive Pied

Would it be: 25% Normal, 25% Normal/Recessive Pied, 25% single factor violet or Green Normal/Violet, 25% Violet Split for Recessive Pied?
Violet is a dominant gene so it can't be carried as split.

So if your pair was
****: normal green
Hen: normal violet blue split for recessive pied

The chicks would all be green and they would all be split for blue because they had a blue parent
The expectation for single factor violet is 50% so half the chicks would inherit the violet but you probably wouldn't be able to see it on the green chicks
The recessive pied mutation would not show in the chicks because recessive mutations must come from both sides to be visible but half of the chicks would be split for recessive pied.

So the end result would be:
25% normal green split for blue
25% normal green split for both blue & recessive pied
25% normal green masking violet & split for blue
25% normal green masking violet & split for both blue & recessive pied

When calculating genetic outcomes first you must know which mutations are dominant, which are recessive & which are sex-linked. Then work out the outcome for each mutation separately and combine the results.

If you have a look at these 2 threads I wrote on simple genetics you might find it easier than trying to follow punnet squares.
http://www.talkbudgies.com/showthread.php?t=22668
http://www.talkbudgies.com/showthread.php?t=23230
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks! I really find punnet squares confusing to me and made me more complicated then it already was. By the way are these genes sex-linked right:
-Opaline
-Ino
-Cinnamon
-Lacewings
-Slate
-Texas Clearbody
Thanks I'm starting to get really good at the sex-linked genes and I though I was starting to mess them up:eek:
 
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