Talk Budgies Forums banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My hen is a light green opaline. I found out this year, when she had bred, that she was split for blue. She also has a mutation in her irises, similar to that seen in recessive pied or dark-eyed clear budgies. Her irises never lightened with age, which I found quite odd, seeing that she was neither a recessive pied or dark-eyed clear. Anyways, her mate is a "normal" sky blue budgie.

I was just wondering what the outcome of the chicks will be if I continue to breed this pair. They last bred during the months of January and February, when they laid and raised their first clutch. The pair is already showing signs that they are ready to start breeding. I suspect they'll breed again this month, or sometime in August.

The pair had 3 surviving chicks during the month of February, when their first clutch hatched. The first 2 chicks that hatched, a male and a female, had the yellowface (type II) mutation. Their original body coloring was sky blue, and they both had normal markings. The only difference between the 2 was that the female has the same eye mutation as her mother. The 3rd chick, a male, is a "normal" light green budgie.

What other outcomes, if there is any others, will show up in future chicks bred by this pair?
 

·
DEACTIVATED ACCOUNT
Joined
·
16,073 Posts
Do you have pictures

There are a few mutations that do not get iris rings

also I've read several times(but don't know how accurate it is) that when a Normal budgie has no iris rings it can mean they're Split to Recessive pied

but if neither parent is pied You'll basically get light greens and normal blues unless one of them ended up having a dark factor then you'd get a few different shades of blue and green

Also you can get some suprises if you've never bred the male before or don't know anything about his background Males can be split to sex linked genes - Which if any pop up they'd be girls Unless mom was one visually because girls can't be split to sex linked genes

some of the most common sex linked genes budgies are split to is
Cinnamon
Opaline
INO(albino or lutino)

Also both parents could be split to recessive pied so you'd get those too if that ended up happening

OKI just re read your post - these 2 bred before - you can still get surprises (I've bred the same pair a few times together and on the 3/4th time they threw me surprises I never got the first few times) Also Your saying neither parent is a yellow face but you got a baby that is .. that means the dad is most likely a Double Factor yellow face(they look like normal "white faces" but they are type 1 yellow face not type 2 - Type 1 stays on the mask, Type 2 bleeds in (if you look in my signature the 2 birds in the center left right corner Both are Sky blue Yellow face type 2 See how it changes the normal sky blue to a sea green color Also they are Father/Daughter)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Based on the information you have supplied it appears your hen is not split Blue but rather split for YF. The males they produced will be split for Opaline. The Light Green chick will be split for Blue.

From the pairing you can only produced Light Greens split for Blue and YF Sky Blues. All males will be split for Opaline. Any other mutations that could be present will not surface unless the pairing is such to allow it. For example if one was split for Recessive Pied you will never know unless you pair to a Recessive Pied.

Would like to see a pic of the hens iris.
 

·
DEACTIVATED ACCOUNT
Joined
·
16,073 Posts
The first 2 chicks that hatched, a male and a female, had the yellowface (type II) mutation. Their original body coloring was sky blue
how can a green budgie and a blue budgie Make blue babies if the The green budgie is not split to blue?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
how can a green budgie and a blue budgie Make blue babies if the The green budgie is not split to blue?


Actually both scenarios are possible and will give the chicks as described by Budgie Bay. The difference will be what the Light Green chick will end up being genetically. It will either be Green/Blue (if the hen is split for YF) or Green/Yellowface (if the **** is a df YF).
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I actually bought both birds from pet stores, and have no clue what their backgrounds are.

The male was bought at a Pet Co, along with another one of my males. I got them the same day. Anyways, both of my males have leg bands with the letters PBPR, so they could possibly be related. My second male had the dominant pied mutation, as well as the yellowface (type II) mutation. Below is a link to a picture of my "normal" sky blue budgie.

http://i1135.photobucket.com/albums/m628/BudgieBay/Calypso/untitled.jpg

I forgot the pet store I bought my hen from. Below is a link to a picture of her with her chicks. The second link is a close up of her face, and it shows what her irises look like up close.

http://i1135.photobucket.com/albums...597519196453_1790202614_1040787_8375938_o.jpg

http://i1135.photobucket.com/albums/m628/BudgieBay/Malutka/DSCN5458.jpg

Let me know if the links don't work.
 

·
DEACTIVATED ACCOUNT
Joined
·
16,073 Posts
the only thing the iris rings tell you is your hen actually is not old enough to breed She's only maybe 6-8 months old

an Iris ring in the Normal mutations that show them will become very light(white) when a budgie is a year or older.
The blue male is maybe 4-5 months old

so unless these are old pictures these birds should not of been bred - they need to be no younger than 12 months old before allowed to breed.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
the only thing the iris rings tell you is your hen actually is not old enough to breed She's only maybe 6-8 months old

an Iris ring in the Normal mutations that show them will become very light(white) when a budgie is a year or older.
The blue male is maybe 4-5 months old

so unless these are old pictures these birds should not of been bred - they need to be no younger than 12 months old before allowed to breed.
The pictures of my hen were taken at the beginning of this year, when she was bred the first time. She had been in my care for nearly 2 years at the time. I am well aware that in order to breed a budgie, the bird must be at least 12 months of age. I usually wait 18 months if I am unsure of the birds age. In this case, I waited almost 2 years. The picture of her mate was taken shortly after I brought him home from the pet store. He was 6 to 8 months old then.

I was confused at first, so I asked questions about my hen before on many different sites. No one would believe me that she was almost 2 years old. I did get a reply once from a well experience show breeder. She told me that my bird could possibly have a recessive pied gene. I just wanted to get others opinions on it as well. I am still very confused.
 

·
DEACTIVATED ACCOUNT
Joined
·
16,073 Posts
The pictures of my hen were taken at the beginning of this year, when she was bred the first time. She had been in my care for nearly 2 years at the time. I am well aware that in order to breed a budgie, the bird must be at least 12 months of age. I usually wait 18 months if I am unsure of the birds age. In this case, I waited almost 2 years. The picture of her mate was taken shortly after I brought him home from the pet store. He was 6 to 8 months old then.

I was confused at first, so I asked questions about my hen before on many different sites. No one would believe me that she was almost 2 years old. I did get a reply once from a well experience show breeder. She told me that my bird could possibly have a recessive pied gene. I just wanted to get others opinions on it as well. I am still very confused.
Like i said earlier I had a Normal Non pied that was well over 2 yrs old no iris ring - thats when I was told she could be split to recessive pied - I didn't end up keeping her so I don't know if she was or not

now I do have another one Who was born here and is going on 3 yrs old and her iris ring is Also light like yours( i was actually going by the baring on the head more than the eyes though when I said how old they looked) Her's is very hard to see it barely ever shows up in pics and to see in person I usually have to use my LED flash light .. with her she has a 50/50 chance of being Split to recessive pied I haven't put her with a visual Recessive pied yet, but I put her with a known Split recessive pied but I didn't get any recessive pied - but that doesn't really mean anything I've gotten surprise mutations pop up 2-4 clutches down the road From the same pair. Some times it just takes longer to show up
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Like i said earlier I had a Normal Non pied that was well over 2 yrs old no iris ring - thats when I was told she could be split to recessive pied - I didn't end up keeping her so I don't know if she was or not

now I do have another one Who was born here and is going on 3 yrs old and her iris ring is Also light like yours( i was actually going by the baring on the head more than the eyes though when I said how old they looked) Her's is very hard to see it barely ever shows up in pics and to see in person I usually have to use my LED flash light .. with her she has a 50/50 chance of being Split to recessive pied I haven't put her with a visual Recessive pied yet, but I put her with a known Split recessive pied but I didn't get any recessive pied - but that doesn't really mean anything I've gotten surprise mutations pop up 2-4 clutches down the road From the same pair. Some times it just takes longer to show up
Hmm. I guess I'll never really know for sure if my hen is split for recessive pied or not. It's really interesting though. Whatever the mutation is, she might have passed it on to 1 of her 3 chicks. All 3 chicks are around 5 months old, and all have lighter irises, except for that 1 chick. That's how I can tell her and her brother apart, because they look identical except for the eyes. Haha.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top