Talk Budgies Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Member of the Month March 2011
Joined
·
19,551 Posts
Masking is when they have a mutation that removes all of the pigment and color from their markings. Mutations that can mask others for example are ino (albino/lutino) dark eyed clear, and df spangle. They are all white or all yellow. These mutations will still have the mutations their parents gave them and will pass them on to their chicks even though you can not see them visually.

Being split means they have the gene in a hidden form and you cant see them. These genes will only be seen in sex linked mutations in female chicks, or when they are paired with another budgie that has the gene in recessive mutations.

Like in the example you mentioned the albino is actually a violet even though you can see it, where as it is only carring a recessive pied gene when it is split for it.

Does that make any sense? :p
 

·
Member of the Month January 2009
Joined
·
3,676 Posts
Most times only breeding will prove if a mutation is masked or split unless you know the parents.

If an albino hen is mated to a normal and they produced a dominant pied chick it would prove that the albino was masking dominant pied because dominant mutations can't be carried as split and it can only have come from the albino

If the albino hen and the normal produced a recessive pied chick it would prove that the normal was split for recessive pied but the albino could be either masking recessive pied or split for it.

If the same albino hen was mated to a recessive pied and any of the chicks were not recessive pied it would prove that the albino was split for recessive pied and not masking it. If she was masking recessive pied all the chicks would be recessive pied

If the mother of an albino was a double factor spangle you can be certain that the albino is masking spangle because all of a double factor spangle's chicks will have at least one spangle factor

If two dilutes produce an albino chick, the albino will be masking dilute because two dilutes paired together will produce 100% dilute chicks

If a pair of opaline spangles produce a double factor spangle chick the chick will be masking opaline because a pair of opalines will produce all opaline chicks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,921 Posts
Do I understand this correct: the difference between masking and being split is the percentage of chicks having that mutation you are going to get. If a ino is making a RP and you pair him with a RP the percentage of RP's are going to be higher than an ino / RP???
 

·
Member of the Month January 2009
Joined
·
3,676 Posts
Do I understand this correct: the difference between masking and being split is the percentage of chicks having that mutation you are going to get. If a ino is making a RP and you pair him with a RP the percentage of RP's are going to be higher than an ino / RP???
The percentage of genes inherited will be higher from a masked mutation but that is not the difference between masking and split.

A masked mutation is the mutation you would be able to see if the bird didn't have the mutation that is masking it.
For example: If an ino didn't have the ino mutation what would it be? If the answer is normal then the ino mutation is not considered to be masking anything, but if the answer is dominant pied then the ino mutation is masking dominant pied

A spangle has bright body color and scalloped wing markings but if the bird is ino as well as spangle the ino mutation will mask all the spangle characteristics making the bird all white or yellow, but this will not stop the bird from being a spangle, it just won't be visible

A split mutation is hidden away in the bird's genes, it is not being covered up by another mutation
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top