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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it possible to have an Opaline / gray wing budgie? Why or why not?

Lol and here's a bonus question if you can answer it: what are some examples of possible mutation combinations? And what are some combinations of mutations that are not possible or not visible?

Just out of curiosity!
 

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Is it possible to have an Opaline / gray wing budgie? Why or why not?

Lol and here's a bonus question if you can answer it: what are some examples of possible mutation combinations? And what are some combinations of mutations that are not possible or not visible?

Just out of curiosity!
Yes a budgie can be both opaline and greywing or it can be opaline split for greywing. If it is male it can be greywing split for opaline

There are literally hundreds of possible combinations. I have several birds with at least 5 mutations. Among my favourites are the yellow face opaline spangle dominant pied violets

A bird cannot be both greywing and dilute or clearwing and dilute, but it can be either clearwing or greywing split for dilute. It also can be both clearwing and greywing

Lutinos, albinos, double factor spangles and dark eyed clears can mask (hide) most other mutations
 

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could you please elaborate on this. thanks
Greywing and clearwing are both dominant to dilute. If a bird had genes for greywing (or clearwing) and dilute it would be a greywing (or clearwing) split for dilute.
This works the same way as normal and greywing. A bird can't show both mutations it would be normal split greywing

Greywing and clearwing are co-dominant to each other so if a bird had both of these mutations they would both show. The name for a composite greywing and clearwing is "Full body greywing"
 

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could you please elaborate on this. thanks
greywing, clearwing and dilute are three mutations of the same gene so they work slightly different than other varieties sometimes.

each gene has two copies (ignoring the sex linked genes at the moment!). as these three mutations are all found on the same gene a bird can only have two of them present at a time.

greywing and clearwing are dominant to dilute, greywing and clearwing are incompletely dominant to each other = they form and intermediate variety when both present.

so a bird can have the following genes present:

greywing and clearwing = full bodied greywing
greywing and dilute = greywing/dilute - looks greywing
clearwing and dilute = clearwing/dilute - looks clearwing
 

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Scratchy reminds me of Tanti? Is Tanti perhaps this mutation?

And if she is, I spose you have another example hey:p
 

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oh whilst on this subject what is dominant cinammon or greywing?
Cinnamon is sex-linked, greywing is recessive so neither is dominant to the other. If you have a bird with both mutations it is usually an in-between shade and often quite hard to identify
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the replies! It's cool to know that it is possible. i would love to come across a cobalt blue Opaline gray wing someday!

Does anyone know where i can find pictures of various mutation combinations?
 

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Does anyone know where i can find pictures of various mutation combinations?
There are dozens of pictures of budgies with different combinations of mutations in the gallery and in the threads on this forum
 

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thanks for the replies. some more questions on the same subject. (hope you dont mind ;))
from what i have heard, a greywing split to dilute looks different to a greywing with two greywing genes. that is, although both have greywings (due to the dominance of greywing over dilute) the body color intensity differs and is possible to visually identify which one is split to dilute and which is not. how true is this?
how does a dilute (both dilute genes) budgie look? do the markings also get diluted or is it only the body color? is it difficult to identify beteen a dilute, greywing split to dilute, and greywing?
thanks
 

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thanks for the replies. some more questions on the same subject. (hope you dont mind ;))
from what i have heard, a greywing split to dilute looks different to a greywing with two greywing genes. that is, although both have greywings (due to the dominance of greywing over dilute) the body color intensity differs and is possible to visually identify which one is split to dilute and which is not. how true is this?
how does a dilute (both dilute genes) budgie look? do the markings also get diluted or is it only the body color? is it difficult to identify beteen a dilute, greywing split to dilute, and greywing?
thanks
A greywing that is split to dilute looks no different from a greywing that is not split (2 greywing genes). There is quite a bit of variation in the shade of the wings in different lines of greywings but this is not due to the presence of the dilute gene

A dilute budgie has both the wing markings and the body colour diluted. Ideally the bird should be almost white or yellow but most dilutes show some colour. Originally they were called "Whites" or Yellows"

There are many birds that are hard to distinguish because they seem to fit between mutations. Often these are cinnamon as well as greywing or dilute. Show breeders often add cinnamon to diffuse the colour
 

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leel,

that is an opaline cinnamon grey. a greywing would have grey markings instead of brown.
Ahhh, thank you. I've never been to sure of her mutation, thanks :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
In that case, is this bird a gray wing or a clear wing?

 
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