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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was reading about mutations and came across this...

"Genetically lacewings are cinnamon lutinos, where cinnamon has crossed over from one side of the allellomorph to the other."

That means a lacewing is a cinnamon ino.

Anyone care to comment?

And share some pictures.

.
 

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yes a Lacewing is made up of either Cinnamon and Lutino Or Cinnamon and Albino

there is like a 3% chance of actually getting one though

Lindsey (Cutelittlebirdiesaviary) has 2
 

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Yup

Here are some of mine that I have had and I currently still have the Green Series Hen:
Antarctica:


Hikari my current bird:






Ki-Uxi:


Gandalf:






Shiori:


 

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I was reading about mutations and came across this...

"Genetically lacewings are cinnamon lutinos, where cinnamon has crossed over from one side of the allellomorph to the other."

That means a lacewing is a cinnamon ino.

Anyone care to comment?

And share some pictures.

.
Where did you come across such a statement with such incorrect nomenclature?

While it is true a Lacewing is a Cinnamon-Ino it is not as the result of a cross from an allelomorph to another. An 'allele' is another term for a variation of a gene and 'morph' means change. Allelomorphs have nothing to do with Lacewings.

The Cinnamon and Ino generally reside on the same choromosome and are passed on in such a manner. They are located 3 map units apart. Chromosomes can cross over onto others and when this happens genetic information is transferred onto the other chromosome. the further apart on a chromosome two genes are the easier it is to 'cross over' and the closer they are together the harder it is. Should the Cinnamon and Ino 'cross over' it will remain together on the chromosome and behave as though it is a true mutation and can be treated as such for breeding purposes. Just as genes can 'cross over' in one way they can do so in reserve and it is know as 'recombination'. In effect they 'cross over' onto separate chromosomes and are then inherited independantly once again.
 
G

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Where did you come across such a statement with such incorrect nomenclature?

While it is true a Lacewing is a Cinnamon-Ino it is not as the result of a cross from an allelomorph to another. An 'allele' is another term for a variation of a gene and 'morph' means change. Allelomorphs have nothing to do with Lacewings.

The Cinnamon and Ino generally reside on the same choromosome and are passed on in such a manner. They are located 3 map units apart. Chromosomes can cross over onto others and when this happens genetic information is transferred onto the other chromosome. the further apart on a chromosome two genes are the easier it is to 'cross over' and the closer they are together the harder it is. Should the Cinnamon and Ino 'cross over' it will remain together on the chromosome and behave as though it is a true mutation and can be treated as such for breeding purposes. Just as genes can 'cross over' in one way they can do so in reserve and it is know as 'recombination'. In effect they 'cross over' onto separate chromosomes and are then inherited independantly once again.
Very precise explanation on the lacewing gene. Thanks, Ripbudgies.

I have a question. I have a **** who I know is split for cinnamon and ino. He is Destiny who is currently breeding with a hen, Jossy. Their 3 youngest pinkies already show cinnamon and albino with her features at few days old. My question is :
Will split for cinnamon and ino for a **** can have the combine Lacewing gene ? In other words, is there any chance my albino chicks turn Lacewings when she is fully feathered as adults ?
 

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Very precise explanation on the lacewing gene. Thanks, Ripbudgies.

I have a question. I have a **** who I know is split for cinnamon and ino. He is Destiny who is currently breeding with a hen, Jossy. Their 3 youngest pinkies already show cinnamon and albino with her features at few days old. My question is :
Will split for cinnamon and ino for a **** can have the combine Lacewing gene ? In other words, is there any chance my albino chicks turn Lacewings when she is fully feathered as adults ?
I was told you could, that is the main reason I kept one of Zeus & Ariel's males - With the pairing 100% of the males will be split to Cinnamon & ino (in my case Albino both parents are Blue series) Zeus is Cinnamon and Ariel is Albino so from zeus 100% of the males are Split to Cinnamon From Ariel 100% of the males are split to Ino
 

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Very precise explanation on the lacewing gene. Thanks, Ripbudgies.

I have a question. I have a **** who I know is split for cinnamon and ino. He is Destiny who is currently breeding with a hen, Jossy. Their 3 youngest pinkies already show cinnamon and albino with her features at few days old. My question is :
Will split for cinnamon and ino for a **** can have the combine Lacewing gene ? In other words, is there any chance my albino chicks turn Lacewings when she is fully feathered as adults ?
If Destiny has both Cinnamon and Ino on the same chromosome they will most likely be passed on together and hence you will breed Lacewing hens. If he has however the Cinnamon on one chromosome and the Ino on another he will pass on either one or the other unless 'cross over' occured. There is only a 3% chance of 'cross over' so rarely happens.

As babies the markings of Lacewings are quite pale and can be missed or misidentified as a badly marked Ino. Once they moult the markings will be Cinnamon. They also have pale violet cheek patches.

When recording the parentage a combination of the Cinnamon and Ino when on the same choromosome will recorded as such Cinnamon-Ino. The hypen denotes linkage. If they are on different chromosomes they are written simply as Cinnamon, Ino as they are separate from each other. As the Cinnamon-Ino linkage can be passed on as a true breeding mutation it gained the name Lacewing and this can be used instead of Cinnamon-Ino.
 
G

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I was told you could, that is the main reason I kept one of Zeus & Ariel's males - With the pairing 100% of the males will be split to Cinnamon & ino (in my case Albino both parents are Blue series) Zeus is Cinnamon and Ariel is Albino so from zeus 100% of the males are Split to Cinnamon From Ariel 100% of the males are split to Ino
If Destiny has both Cinnamon and Ino on the same chromosome they will most likely be passed on together and hence you will breed Lacewing hens. If he has however the Cinnamon on one chromosome and the Ino on another he will pass on either one or the other unless 'cross over' occured. There is only a 3% chance of 'cross over' so rarely happens.

As babies the markings of Lacewings are quite pale and can be missed or misidentified as a badly marked Ino. Once they moult the markings will be Cinnamon. They also have pale violet cheek patches.

When recording the parentage a combination of the Cinnamon and Ino when on the same choromosome will recorded as such Cinnamon-Ino. The hypen denotes linkage. If they are on different chromosomes they are written simply as Cinnamon, Ino as they are separate from each other. As the Cinnamon-Ino linkage can be passed on as a true breeding mutation it gained the name Lacewing and this can be used instead of Cinnamon-Ino.
Thanks for your helpful opinions, Atvchick95 and RIPBudgies.

I am longing for the 3% to come true. Come on, Lacewings show up for me to turn me into the happiest person on earth.
 

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My lacewings were bred originally by crossing inos & cinnamons to produce **** birds that were split for both mutations. These split cocks were mated to cinnamon hens and produced my first lacewing hens. Here are a couple of pictures



 

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Nice LW's Nev. I especially like them in white.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
My lacewings were bred originally by crossing inos & cinnamons to produce **** birds that were split for both mutations. These split cocks were mated to cinnamon hens and produced my first lacewing hens. Here are a couple of pictures



Thanks for the comments and pictures of beautiful birds.

.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thank you!

Where did you come across such a statement with such incorrect nomenclature?

While it is true a Lacewing is a Cinnamon-Ino it is not as the result of a cross from an allelomorph to another. An 'allele' is another term for a variation of a gene and 'morph' means change. Allelomorphs have nothing to do with Lacewings.

The Cinnamon and Ino generally reside on the same choromosome and are passed on in such a manner. They are located 3 map units apart. Chromosomes can cross over onto others and when this happens genetic information is transferred onto the other chromosome. the further apart on a chromosome two genes are the easier it is to 'cross over' and the closer they are together the harder it is. Should the Cinnamon and Ino 'cross over' it will remain together on the chromosome and behave as though it is a true mutation and can be treated as such for breeding purposes. Just as genes can 'cross over' in one way they can do so in reserve and it is know as 'recombination'. In effect they 'cross over' onto separate chromosomes and are then inherited independantly once again.
If Destiny has both Cinnamon and Ino on the same chromosome they will most likely be passed on together and hence you will breed Lacewing hens. If he has however the Cinnamon on one chromosome and the Ino on another he will pass on either one or the other unless 'cross over' occured. There is only a 3% chance of 'cross over' so rarely happens.

As babies the markings of Lacewings are quite pale and can be missed or misidentified as a badly marked Ino. Once they moult the markings will be Cinnamon. They also have pale violet cheek patches.

When recording the parentage a combination of the Cinnamon and Ino when on the same choromosome will recorded as such Cinnamon-Ino. The hypen denotes linkage. If they are on different chromosomes they are written simply as Cinnamon, Ino as they are separate from each other. As the Cinnamon-Ino linkage can be passed on as a true breeding mutation it gained the name Lacewing and this can be used instead of Cinnamon-Ino.
Thank you Ripbudgies.

I read it here...

-http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ozbudgies/-

Nice explanation once again. Somehow it is very easy for me to understand when you explain it.

.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Very precise explanation on the lacewing gene. Thanks, Ripbudgies.

I have a question. I have a **** who I know is split for cinnamon and ino. He is Destiny who is currently breeding with a hen, Jossy. Their 3 youngest pinkies already show cinnamon and albino with her features at few days old. My question is :
Will split for cinnamon and ino for a **** can have the combine Lacewing gene ? In other words, is there any chance my albino chicks turn Lacewings when she is fully feathered as adults ?
I wish you get some Lacewings. Sure everybody will love to see some pictures.

.
 

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i read that lacewings almost always appears in english budgie,

so ..................i was wondering whether this is true or not,:)
 

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i read that lacewings almost always appears in english budgie,

so ..................i was wondering whether this is true or not,:)
Lacewings can be bred in any budgie what so ever, show or pet. They are more prevelent in show type because there are classes for them so they are bred specifically. Most pet type birds are bred by people who don't know how to get them.

As long as you know what you are doing you can breed large numbers of any variety you wish.
 

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My lacewings were bred originally by crossing inos & cinnamons to produce **** birds that were split for both mutations. These split cocks were mated to cinnamon hens and produced my first lacewing hens. Here are a couple of pictures



OK, Nev, now this makes me wonder. If the cinnamon has to get onto the same chromosome as the ino, do you think that by using the cinnamon hen, that you increased the ability for that to happen? Or do you still have to rely on the cinnamon from the MALE to cross over to his ino gene?
 
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