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There are so many possibilities here that a trip to the vet is the only way that you will get a diagnosis and proper treatment. A few things that come to mind in which you might see the lethargy, weakness and stumbling are heavy metal poisoning, electrolyte imbalance, dehydration, nutritional issues, kidney and liver issues, & pituitary tumor. Does he eat pellets only, what do the droppings look like? Are you able to keep him in a separate cage until the vet see him? Are you sure he is eating and not just picking?
 

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Don't be concerned about him not eating fruits, they are high in sugar, the veggies are better anyway. Is he falling off of the perch? It would be a good idea to put a folded towel at the bottom of his cage and cover it with paper towels so if he falls it will be soft. Please keep us posted on his condition after the vet visit.
 

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With a small bird a blood sample is often obtained by a nail clip, a very small amount of blood is needed and this method is simple and quick, even x-rays can be done without anesthesia by a skilled team. If the vet determines that the bird is just too stressed just by be being there then the tests should not be done. Sometimes without tests it can be a guessing game as to what is wrong and the best treatment to be followed but there are times when tests may not be able to be done.
 

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I agree with FaeryBee that Napoleon is not well. It is quite common for a bird to look well when at the vet when in fact they are not well and if no tests are done the issue will not be uncovered. I would show the vet the video where he is puffed up at about the 1:20 minute point in what you posted. In watching the whole video I am wondering if the problem might be in the feet and legs, perhaps there is pain in perching and moving and that translates into the stumbling. One thing that can effect the feet and legs is articular gout, which can be very painful, it effects the joints and visceral gout which effects the internal organs, here is some info on gout, it might be worth asking the vet if there is a chance that could be the issue. Gout in Birds | PetMD At the very least I would have the vet do a fecal gram stain test, all this requires is a fresh dropping, it is nothing invasive to the bird.
 

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You can ask that a gram stain test be done on the droppings and as for the blood work a CBC would be a place to start. Have you been able to get a good look at the bottom of the feet and check for bumblefoot? Do you know how much bird experience the vet you are seeing has? Have a look at this to help you better understand various tests Understanding Avian Laboratory Tests by Peter S Sakas...
 

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I would try again to get an appointment with your usual vet even if it is weeks out and meanwhile work with the vet that saw him last time. It does seem odd that a vet that works with birds does not recognize the brand Roudybush and as far as the vitamins go Dr. Labfeber, now deceased, is the vet that developed many of the Lafeber products. Yes a nail clip can be the source of blood for a small bird, in my opinion any vet that is doing blood work on birds should be familiar with this procedure but I think you should ask the vet what method is used and if the tests are done in house. I know that my vet collects via a nail clip on small birds and the blood is directly collected in microhematocrit tubes and tests such as a CBC run in house so the results are available within 30 minutes, this takes special equipment and not all vets have this capability, some have to send the samples out to a lab. You can always ask the vet or the techs how much experience the vet there has with birds. I would start with the least invasive test which is the fecal gram stain, if that does not reveal anything then perhaps consider other tests.
 

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You are giving the Baytril right into the mouth correct? If there is a bacterial infection you should see some improvement within several days.
 

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As you know the nails are too long and that can interfere with the ability to perch or stand properly, in the center of the bottom of the left foot I think I see a piece of what looks like maybe a piece of loose skin and the one rear toe looks a bit red, dark, but it could be just the lighting or shadow on it
 

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The method I use is as follows: I give the meds in the morning while it is still fairly dark and the birds have not yet begun to be active because the room is still dark and they are still covered. You have to have a nightlight or something so you can see a bit what you are doing, let your eyes adjust to the darkness of the room before beginning. Make sure you know where he is sitting in the cage , if there are other birds in the cage this may be a bit more difficult. Very slowly and quietly open the cage door reach in and gently cup your hands around him and remove him from the cage, do not grab with one hand if at all possible, this may be more difficult if the cage has only a small door, sit down and place him on a table or your knee, during all this time I find that it is best to use only the amount of restraint with your hands necessary to keep him from flying off, the more gentle you are the less he will fight and squirm around. Once you are sitting administer the meds into the mouth and return him immediately to the cage and keep the lights off and let him relax. This may work out better if he is comfortable sleeping in a cage by himself because when you put your hand in the cage to remove him you will not be spooking the other birds, once that happens you need to back off and try again later, the last thing you want is to try to catch him when all the birds are in a frenzy. My birds are not hand tame and I have used this method hundreds of times, make sure you have the meds ready in the syringe before you begin and stay calm.
 

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I think the Baytril needs more time to show if it is going to make a difference, it is a broad spectrum antibiotic very commonly used in birds. Did the vet call you yet with the results of the fecal exam? If there is no improvement by Tuesday even though the vet thinks the metal toxicity is a long shot I would ask about testing for it. If the vet thinks the test would be too stressful ask about treating for it.
 

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I would call early morning in Tuesday, you never know how long it will take for someone to get back to you. Metal toxicity is usually treated with injections of calcium EDTA but there may be an oral treatment as well. From what I know with the injections the response is usually pretty quick.
 

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Hard to say about improvement, if a bacterial infection is not the issue then improvement would not be expected also if it is some type of stubborn bacterial infection and the Baytril is not the right antibiotic for it then again little improvement would be expected.
 

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There have been times when I have used Baytril and the dose was .02ml twice a day, so I don't think a little extra one time will make any difference. It is important to give the antibiotic for a specific length of time because it takes a certain amount of time to fully kill off the pathogenic bacteria.
 

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He may be a bit traumatized from the ordeal and also may not like being in the hospital cage. I would just keep him separate and see if he seems to be in any pain from the wound, see if he will eat a small piece of millet.
 
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