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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Quick question, my friend just adopted two beautiful Lutino parakeets, male and female.
She also has a male Albino. She was under the impression that breeding Lutino w/ Lutino or Lutino w/ Albino were no-no's. I told her I would ask the professionals to clear this up for us. :) Are there any other no-no's that we should know about? Thank you for your time!
 

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♥Budgies No.1 fan♥
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as nev said if they are not related then is perfectly fine
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I always thought the chicks would loose +- 20 % of their sight. I've read about more problems, but I have to look that up again..
I remembered there was an earlier tread on the same subject. You mentioned about cockatiels and not budgies.

So far I have not read anything detrimental whatsoever in books or online. Since it is not documented, pairing ino's should not be a problem unless through siblings pairing.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you everybirdy for all the advice! Looks like I started a little debate! :) I'm curious now, and will probably continue to research this.

Another debate that I've heard of and wondering if it is true or not, is that Albinos don't live as long because they are weaker. Has anyone heard of this? :S
 

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I agree with Marit... (must be Nationality ;))

ino + ino gives weaker birds.

An ino mutation is always weaker and breeding 2 inos together will produce even weaker birds.

Ino's having not as good eyesight as black eyed birds is something i have experienced myself. Coco was always less orientating in a darker room then the others. She was also often the cause off panic attacks at night time.

(hmm resource for this info... can not find it right now... but this is something i was tought thru several forums and breeders...)

They do say ino's dont live as long, because of their weaker "condition" .

http://www.talkbudgies.com/showpost.php?p=294671&postcount=1

quote from the next link:
I never put two red eyes together for breeding, reason being Inos have a lethal gene. It causes weak young and death in most cases and for me a lesson never to be repeated.
http://fischerlovebirds.bravehost.com/
Even though its about lovebirds here, i believe this is the same for all our parrots and parakeets...
 

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Thank you everybirdy for all the advice! Looks like I started a little debate! :) I'm curious now, and will probably continue to research this.

Another debate that I've heard of and wondering if it is true or not, is that Albinos don't live as long because they are weaker. Has anyone heard of this? :S
i have never herard of this and i hope its not true..i have an albino!
 

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And their diet should be stable as the Albinos and the Lutinos are prone to liver disease.
...and I hope I'm giving the right information.

But I'm still not getting how Albinos are different from Lutinos.
Lutinos born with yellow feathers only and Albinos can be born with any other different colors of feathers except yellow? Is that the main difference between Albinos and Lutinos?
Sorry for such goofy questions.:eek: I'm a bit nerdy.:1zhelp:
 

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And their diet should be stable as the Albinos and the Lutinos are prone to liver disease.
...and I hope I'm giving the right information.

But I'm still not getting how Albinos are different from Lutinos.
Lutinos born with yellow feathers only and Albinos can be born with any other different colors of feathers except yellow? Is that the main difference between Albinos and Lutinos?
Sorry for such goofy questions.:eek: I'm a bit nerdy.:1zhelp:
Albinos are the ino of the blue series, whereas Lutinos are the ino of the green series. You can only get white Albino's as their blue pigmentation is non-existent, leaving a striking white. I think it's the same occurrence with a Lutino, however with Lutinos the green pigmentation is non-existent leaving a vibrant yellow behind. The main difference is their feather colour, which is reliant on what colour series they are from. (White/Albino- Blue Series, Yellow/Lutino- Green Series) Both ino's have red eyes, also from a lack of pigmentation I think. :dunno:

This is by my understanding of the ino genetic and is probably not entirely correct. Hopefully, it helps you understand the ino genetic somewhat. :eek:
 

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Lutinos and albinos lack colour pigment (melanin) which has no relationship with anything except their colour

The main reason that some birds have a shorter life span than others is because they are the result of being bred from closely related parents. This practice is very common with inos

My lutinos and Albinos are just as healthy as any of my other birds and there is no reason why they will not live just as long. Also there has never been any problem with their eye sight
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Nev90, the best explanation ever from a veteran breeder. I hope this dispell all false assumptions of ino's lifespan.

No documentation from any books or online, never assert anything negative about inos. I have a creamino which is as lively and healthy as any other budgies.
 

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Oy, oy, oy, I just brought a red-eye lutino budgie a week ago and I was only aware that their eyes are sensitive to bright light, which should be avoided around them (e.g. fluorescent light, flash from a camera, etc). But..... I did not know that they might be prone to liver problems, live not as long as other budgies and that their eye sight is not as good.
However, after reading Nev's post, I am less worried now, but still a bit concerned.
 

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I have been breeding Ino's for years - although I've never been lucky enough to have a male Ino until recently (Thanks Nev!!)...

I don't have any issue with breeding Ino to Ino.. Nev is completely right at what he is saying, and I have two of his beautiful Ino's - who are perfect in every way, and I will be breeding them as soon as they are old enough...

Inbreeding causes problems... Not the fact that they have no pigment in their feathers!!

But please don't post information about the negative effects of breeding Ino to Ino without proper documented proof!!

Lots of people own Ino's, and the kind of things that you are saying are just plain scary...

There are many illnesses, diseases, parasites, tumours, genetic problems that can occur in any type of birds.. Sadly, it's one of the risks that people take in owning pets of any kind!!

Responsible breeders take all the steps that they can to ensure that the birds they breed healthy birds... Responsible breeders can trace the genetics of their birds back generations...

People are entilted to their own opinion... But back it up, please...
 

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I don't know how much this could relate to budgies, but I do know for a fact that red-eye rats have poorer eye sight than black eyed rats. I've owned many pet rats in the past years (much more than budgies) and the red-eyed rats always show signs of poor eye sight. They are much more hesitate to approach objects/people, they remain still and sway back and forth a long time, trying to figure out what something is, and they seem to startle easier.
-shrugs- It's interesting. :)
 

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I have a three year old albino (female) and she show no sign of slowing down at all. She still swings of the top of her cage by her beak sometimes just as she did when she was 9 weeks old! It all depends on how well you look after the bird. Treat it bad and you can pretty much say bye to the bird now. But look after it as well as i haved and i'm sure the albino budgie will be around til it was 10 or more!
 
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