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Member of the Month June 2015
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I was in the petshop yesterday and got into a discussion about megabacteria with one of the staff who is also a bird breeder and bird fanatic. I'm not sure how long this treatment has been around but by the way he was talking it's fairly new and apparently clears megabacteria up completely so I wanted to share it with members here and perhaps anyone who has birds with the condition might like to discuss with their avian vets.

Megabacteria in Australian Budgerigars - Vetafarm

It seems to be a major breakthrough but is very expensive (I think about $250 for a bottle)
 

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Hi Niamh
Thankyou for posting this link, I am not positive but I think this medication is and has ben available overseas for treating Megabac.
I am sure out other valued members will let us know when they are on line next.
I will definitely discuss this with my vet when next seeing her , as Budget is a carrier as I am sure you know as I talk about it often enough. LOL.:D
 

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Member of the Month June 2015
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Niamh
Thankyou for posting this link, I am not positive but I think this medication is and has ben available overseas for treating Megabac.
I am sure out other valued members will let us know when they are on line next.
I will definitely discuss this with my vet when next seeing her , as Budget is a carrier as I am sure you know as I talk about it often enough. LOL.:D
Yes I was thinking of Budget when I heard about it :)
 

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Member of the Year 2016//Exceptional Service Award
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Megabac

Thank you for posting this link. The more data we can collect the better we will be able to respond to this issue effectively. Check out the references at the top of Illness and disease section Here on TB.

Amphoterracin B is currently the most effective but very expensive response to the fungal type organism, Megabacteria. There are homeopathic remedies, and other older antifungal treatments, But the Amphoterracin B is currently the best known and appears to be very effective but it is very expensive. Treating one bird is doable But a large flock is a big problem. Currently Sodium Benzoate is gaining in popularity across the globe because it is very cheap and you can purchase human grade on amazon in quantity for very reasonable cost.

There are now vets across the globe using it. We use Amphoteracin B in conjunction with Sodiun Benzoate. I also know breeders who have recovered the health of their flock using concentrated dose of Sodium Benzoate according to the Instructions listed in the Paper referenced and reprinted By
Sharman Hoppes,DVM at the Texas A & M university vet clinic in the Vet school school of medicine. and listed in a Sticky at the top of illness section here on TB.

The Megabacteria is often missed in the fecal exam as this organism seems to be passed in droppings intermittently. My bird did not show until the
organism was identified in the Necropsy done in speciality lab here in Georgia at the university of Georgia in Athens. So the best thing to do is have a campaign of clean environment, healthy food, and being alert to stressful situations your birds face. Cathy/Pretty Boy 's Budget is an example of being able to successfully catch and treat the Megabacteria before it has a chance to form a lethal attack on the organ systems of Your bird. The key here is to seek treatment ASAP when your budgie shows signs of illness. If left to linger in the bird, nothing your vet will be able to do when the birds body shuts down and it is no longer able to absorb nutrition through the GI tract. the Megabacteria attaches in the GI and blocks the absorption of nutrition. the result is usually seen as a radical loss of weight while the budgie seems to be eating like a little pig. Dropping often contain undigested seed. Typical signs of lethargy, fluffing, failure to sing/chirp are also general signs of other illnesses as well. Often The Megabac teams up with bacterial infections such that the bird will appear to get better and then reverse when the other organism attacks the immune system. It is hard to Diagnose. If untreated a budgie literally starves to death before your eyes. At some point untreated Megabac destroys the function of internal organs leading to mass organ system failure.

We Use Sodium Benzoate as a periodic prevention during weather that is conducive to the proliferation of Magabac and other fungal organisms. the hot muggy days of summer fit the bill perfectly here in Georgia. We do not give meds to chicks and breeding parents and families. In times of stress We start Electrolyte/probiotics alternating with ACV in drinking water and during
illness we soak millet spray in the electrolyte/probiotic water to encourage budgies who are off their food to eat. Recovery often hinges on getting your bird to eat and keep the little guys furnace going to keep it warm. A cold budgie is in trouble. When in doubt provide alternative heat in form of heat lamp, heat pad, pet snuggle, even a sock full of dry seeds and warmed in a microwave will work. Even a comfy snuggle on moms chest will help.

Best wishes, Jo Ann:p
 

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We had some intermittent problems with mega when first establishing our flock. Unfortunately due to the fact that it doesn't always show up in tests, our vet tried other treatment options first (antibiotics) and we lost a few birds. I was able to track down sodium benzoate on Jo Ann's advice and while it doesn't seem to help a bird that's very sick already, even with a secondary antibiotic, it does seem to work as a preventative and a treatment when symptoms are picked up early on. We haven't had any problems since, I treat the whole flock just before breeding season, twice yearly. Treating the whole flock on Amphotericin B would be too cost prohibitive. Even treating individual birds, just sitting around waiting for them to get sick, is extremely expensive. Prevention seems to be key with this problem. I also get out there with bottles of white vinegar if we get enough rain to cause problems - soak the whole floor with it, give a scrub with a broom and then rinse. ACV and probiotics in their drinking water weekly.
 
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