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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am going shopping for my budgies on Saturday. I already checked out two shops that had budgies. I didn't come home with any though as I wanted to research a little bit as to what I should get. I found a violet colored bird which is the color I would like to breed for. I think I would like to get four birds. I will do my best with sexing them from the info I have gathered here. What would go good with the violet in hopes of producing some violets. They had a beautiful sky blue that I think is a greywing, a couple of really nice med/dark grey. Some pretty cobalts and some mauves (not fond of the mauves unless it is a good way to get violets).
I also love the yellows and they had some which i think are lutinos as well as some pied (yellow with small amount of green on rump), and some yellow and gray pied. I have been reading and reading on genetics info and just when I think I have it figured out I get confused. Am I right to think that a cobalt would be the best if don't find two visual violets? Thank you for any help. Oh, they also had some greens, olives but I was pretty sure that is not the color I need???
 

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If your goal is to breed violets it would be best to buy all double factor violets. If you can only find a couple double factor violets you can breed them with sky blues and cobalts to get single factor violet chicks. Don't breed them with mauves or any yellow based birds for the best results. Green birds can also be violet but the violet wont show the bird will look greyed and any yellow face genes will dull the violet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Does double factor mean that both parents were visual violets? Or can they get a violet gene from a violet factored parent that does not show the color?I assume that I cannot tell if a chick is single or double factored just by looking at it, or is there a way? Thank you for answering.
 

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With double factor Violets (particularly Cobalt Df Violets--this is the purple colour you are looking for) the difference is quite striking from single factor Cobalt Violets.

However, I find Violet a rather difficult mutation in that there are SF and DF Violet Skyblues, Cobalts, and Mauves...And especially with the Skyblues and Cobalts it can get hard to tell if they're Skyblue or Cobalt, and single factor or double factor!!

Easy way to do this: Go for the most brightest, vibrant purples you can find. These will likely be DF Violet Cobalts, and you can pair them to each other or to other birds and go from there.
 

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need help--

Hi,

Violet dark green is very good way to keep visual violet in the matings My very first pair was a dark green spangle **** split for blue and a normal cobalt violet hen. They produced an olive spangle **** and violet dark green normals and spangle. Pairing violet dark green with Cobalt produced violet chicks. Mauve can bring out the violet as well. Violet dark greens have violet feathers under the tail near vent and a deeper richer green body color. Better to check with a breeder than a pet store to find the right genetics. If you do not like dark factors, sky violets are good starters as well. now have the olive spangle with a violet dark green hen hoping for violets. Violet dark green spangle hen sister to olive spangle produced violet with cobalt ****. :budgie:

Blessings,

Jo Ann
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
With double factor Violets (particularly Cobalt Df Violets--this is the purple colour you are looking for) the difference is quite striking from single factor Cobalt Violets.

However, I find Violet a rather difficult mutation in that there are SF and DF Violet Skyblues, Cobalts, and Mauves...And especially with the Skyblues and Cobalts it can get hard to tell if they're Skyblue or Cobalt, and single factor or double factor!!

Easy way to do this: Go for the most brightest, vibrant purples you can find. These will likely be DF Violet Cobalts, and you can pair them to each other or to other birds and go from there.
Thank you Jen, this info is very helpful! You explained it very well too!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi,

Violet dark green is very good way to keep visual violet in the matings My very first pair was a dark green spangle **** split for blue and a normal cobalt violet hen. They produced an olive spangle **** and violet dark green normals and spangle. Pairing violet dark green with Cobalt produced violet chicks. Mauve can bring out the violet as well. Violet dark greens have violet feathers under the tail near vent and a deeper richer green body color. Better to check with a breeder than a pet store to find the right genetics. If you do not like dark factors, sky violets are good starters as well. now have the olive spangle with a violet dark green hen hoping for violets. Violet dark green spangle hen sister to olive spangle produced violet with cobalt ****. :budgie:

Blessings,

Jo Ann


Very interesting, I didn't think that the greens could/would contribute like that. I am going to sit and go over everything you said and TRY to take it all in. I find the genetics part of all of this very fun, although it does make my head spin. :spin: Thank you very much for your input!
 
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