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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Friends -

As a result of circumstance, I have been left with a male budgie, about a year old, who is semi-tamed but skittish. I'd like to get a partner for him, and have the chance to get a hand-raised bird that might be more tame from the start. But when I introduce them - will the tameness of #2 rub off on #1, or will it be the other way around - will the younger budgie loose his tameness and become skittish like #1?

Thanks In advance for your advice!!
 

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Every situation is different so you really cannot predict which way it will turn out. Just because a bird is hand raised does not mean it will be tame, you should clarify with whoever you are getting the bird from just what they mean by hand raised and even if it is tame with whoever raised it there will be a period of adjustment when in a new home.
 

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Hi, Welcome to Talk Budgies!

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Hello and welcome to the forums!
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The above responses are more experienced than mine. I do think however that it depends on the time you have for a dear little feathered friend. If you have lots of time for just one that is ok. A budgie can be happy with a regular human.

If you are gone a lot you need to get another birdo. Beyond that what you want is secondary, to be involved in your budgies.

Ask yourself honestly what makes your bird happy and then try to develop past that.

Just my thoughts

Thanks
 

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Iris and Dawn
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Hello and welcome! A few months ago I was facing a very similar situation. First thing that needs to be said, though, is that every bird is different. They have personalities, that, just like ours, are shaped by genetics and experience, so something that happened to my pair won't necessarily happen to your.

Iris flew into my room late February, escaping a gull. We don't know where she came from, nobody answered my ads and frankly I was glad, because it was obvious she was not well-taken care of. She had never seen toys, ladders or even cuttlebone. She was even afraid of water that wasn't in a silo! She was already an adult, probably over a year old but not too old, and completely wild but very sweet and smart. Considering she is a female, and they don't bond as easily with humans, plus at time I can be at the lab for 12-14 hours per experiment (oh the life of a PhD student...), I decided she could use some company. She was comfortable enough in her new home and we'd made progress with taming, but she was still bored and a little apprehensivce of non-destructable toys, she just didn't know how to have fun.

After some though I decided on an adult female companion, that'd be hand-raised and relatively tame, hoping that the new budgie's lack of fear would encourage Iris to be less afraid and loosen up. I was going to buy one from a breeder, but when a budgie matching my criteria showed up in a facebook ad needing a new home, I picked her up a day later. To paint a picture of how tame Dawn is, her dad's sister brought her to us in the lobby of the building by having her perched on her shoulder. She hopped in the travelling cage by herself, her trust in humans was 100%. The next day, in quarantine, she ate from my hand, climbed up my arm and perched on my bun! Coming from a home with many parrots and other birds, she craved attention from both humans and parrots, so 40 days later when I brought the two cages in the same room she literally tunnelled into the food bowl to get out. I let her out and she glued herself to Iris' cage. A little later I was fixing a branch in Iris' cage and Dawn snuck in. They get along fine together, so I have't separated them since.

To answer the question directly in my case: both happened, because theyre both clever girls. One learnt from the other various things. Dawn was clipped and preferred to walk everywhere, while Iris is a fantastic flyer (found us on the 6th floor!). The moment she went into moult, she started paying close attention to Iris' excursions around the room. Having grown up with large parrots, she is amazing at holding stuff in her "hand" to bring them closer - Iris learnt to do it too! By watching Dawn have a ball with toys, Iris will try out the simple ones, preferably those that don't make noise, bells are still scarrryyyyy.

In general, budgies get closer to their own rather than a human, but males in particular can be literally glued to their human parent. Things turned out well for my girls; sure Dawn is a little more wild that she used to, but she still is completely okay being close to me. As for Iris, she has made fantastic progress and now steps up happily. She'd still rather sit on a perch and sing her little heart out all day than play or even chew stuff, but she does get out, get exercise, enjoys baths (same bird that had a complete meltdown when a droplet of water left on the cillantro touched her beak) and seems happy.

Since you have a boy, you need to make the decision to bring a friend after some thought, since he may already be attached to you and happy with the arrangement. His needs and how you can cater to them best comes first, always. If you decide to get a friend indeed, chances are a little bit of both is going to happen, but to what extent only time will tell.

Wish you guys all the best and sorry for narrating my budgies' life story...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hello and welcome! A few months ago I was facing a very similar situation. First thing that needs to be said, though, is that every bird is different. They have personalities, that, just like ours, are shaped by genetics and experience, so something that happened to my pair won't necessarily happen to your.

Iris flew into my room late February, escaping a gull. We don't know where she came from, nobody answered my ads and frankly I was glad, because it was obvious she was not well-taken care of. She had never seen toys, ladders or even cuttlebone. She was even afraid of water that wasn't in a silo! She was already an adult, probably over a year old but not too old, and completely wild but very sweet and smart. Considering she is a female, and they don't bond as easily with humans, plus at time I can be at the lab for 12-14 hours per experiment (oh the life of a PhD student...), I decided she could use some company. She was comfortable enough in her new home and we'd made progress with taming, but she was still bored and a little apprehensivce of non-destructable toys, she just didn't know how to have fun.

After some though I decided on an adult female companion, that'd be hand-raised and relatively tame, hoping that the new budgie's lack of fear would encourage Iris to be less afraid and loosen up. I was going to buy one from a breeder, but when a budgie matching my criteria showed up in a facebook ad needing a new home, I picked her up a day later. To paint a picture of how tame Dawn is, her dad's sister brought her to us in the lobby of the building by having her perched on her shoulder. She hopped in the travelling cage by herself, her trust in humans was 100%. The next day, in quarantine, she ate from my hand, climbed up my arm and perched on my bun! Coming from a home with many parrots and other birds, she craved attention from both humans and parrots, so 40 days later when I brought the two cages in the same room she literally tunnelled into the food bowl to get out. I let her out and she glued herself to Iris' cage. A little later I was fixing a branch in Iris' cage and Dawn snuck in. They get along fine together, so I have't separated them since.

To answer the question directly in my case: both happened, because theyre both clever girls. One learnt from the other various things. Dawn was clipped and preferred to walk everywhere, while Iris is a fantastic flyer (found us on the 6th floor!). The moment she went into moult, she started paying close attention to Iris' excursions around the room. Having grown up with large parrots, she is amazing at holding stuff in her "hand" to bring them closer - Iris learnt to do it too! By watching Dawn have a ball with toys, Iris will try out the simple ones, preferably those that don't make noise, bells are still scarrryyyyy.

In general, budgies get closer to their own rather than a human, but males in particular can be literally glued to their human parent. Things turned out well for my girls; sure Dawn is a little more wild that she used to, but she still is completely okay being close to me. As for Iris, she has made fantastic progress and now steps up happily. She'd still rather sit on a perch and sing her little heart out all day than play or even chew stuff, but she does get out, get exercise, enjoys baths (same bird that had a complete meltdown when a droplet of water left on the cillantro touched her beak) and seems happy.

Since you have a boy, you need to make the decision to bring a friend after some thought, since he may already be attached to you and happy with the arrangement. His needs and how you can cater to them best comes first, always. If you decide to get a friend indeed, chances are a little bit of both is going to happen, but to what extent only time will tell.

Wish you guys all the best and sorry for narrating my budgies' life story...
Thank you so much for this answer! It is really very helpful - I appreciate you taking the time! My boy is making progress on his own; but he was really bolder when he had a girlfriend / auntie. That may just be a male female dynamic, but I'm feeling he'll be bolder again with a friend. So I'll be proceeding as such - with luck, will get a had fed baby today! and after some quarantine, will see how they do together.

Thanks for sharing your story!:)
 

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Please make sure the budgie you choose is the same gender (male) so you won't have to worry with preventing breeding.
 
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