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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
His dad was Red eye lacewing, white series, and mom was violet [normal as far as i know] Would love to get more greys, what color would be best for that? Here is a pic of the grey:



Thanks to all for the help, and I hope all have a Happy Thanksgiving!
 

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It looks blue to me, I guess my sense of colour is off tonight or something, not sure about the combo needed but their is some excellent breeders here that probably help you out also a section on this go have a peek!
 

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I was thinking mauve when I saw it my self

The mom actually looks cobalt blue and not violet

but i'm not expert - Nev90 would be the one to answer this question :D
 

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Its a grey with no dark factor. Best pairing would be to a normal blue or violet as this should theoretically give you 50%.

Budgies carry two colour factors although they may only display a dominant gene like green if they are green split blue.
Green is dominant to blue. So greenxgreen = green, green x blue = green
Green and grey are co-dominant to eachother, but both dominant over blue so:
Green x grey = grey/green coloured bird (both colours display and mix)
Grey x blue = Single factor grey bird, split for blue (appears grey)

Your grey is a single factor grey split for blue (grey x blue). If you want to make more greys, you should theoretically get 50% grey chicks by pairing your grey x blue to a blue x blue bird. The best pairing would be grey x grey (double factor grey) bred to a grey x grey. But that is all you will get from that pairing. A grey x grey bred to a blue x blue will give you all visual greys (blue x grey).

Hope that makes sense! Basically, breed it to any blue and you can get some grey's in the nest!

P.S Yes he could be a mauve if the lacewing parent is masking cobalt (or grey x blue with a dark factor). Without knowing what the lacewing is masking it's hard to say.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Its a grey with no dark factor. Best pairing would be to a normal blue or violet as this should theoretically give you 50%.

Budgies carry two colour factors although they may only display a dominant gene like green if they are green split blue.
Green is dominant to blue. So greenxgreen = green, green x blue = green
Green and grey are co-dominant to eachother, but both dominant over blue so:
Green x grey = grey/green coloured bird (both colours display and mix)
Grey x blue = Single factor grey bird, split for blue (appears grey)

Your grey is a single factor grey split for blue (grey x blue). If you want to make more greys, you should theoretically get 50% grey chicks by pairing your grey x blue to a blue x blue bird. The best pairing would be grey x grey (double factor grey) bred to a grey x grey. But that is all you will get from that pairing. A grey x grey bred to a blue x blue will give you all visual greys (blue x grey).

Hope that makes sense! Basically, breed it to any blue and you can get some grey's in the nest!

P.S Yes he could be a mauve if the lacewing parent is masking cobalt (or grey x blue with a dark factor). Without knowing what the lacewing is masking it's hard to say.
Thankyou, it did help. I can find out if the lacewing dad carried cobalt or not. Then if so, it is mauve? Should I still pair it with blue?
 

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He is definately a single factor grey you can tell by the colour of his cheek patches. Since he is very light he probably has no dark factor. The lacewing parent is masking grey, if the grey had come from the cobalt you'd be able to see it. If you breed from him you will get 50% sf grey if he is mated to any shade of blue. A sky blue mate will give you a similar shade of grey but if you want darker grey then choose a mauve or cobalt. I would avoid pairing him to a violet because it produces a very odd shade. If he was paired to another single factor grey you'd get 50% sf grey, 25% double factor grey and 25% blue. If pairing to a grey the shade will still be affected by the dark factor
 
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