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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, its been a while since I have been on here.
This is my new baby Ozzie.
I think he is a dilute spangle because of his wing colour rather than grey wing, what are everyone's thoughts please? Also, because of the dilution, is he a dark green??
Thanks :)
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I thought for him to be greywing, he has to have grey wings? :)
Ozzie's are light yellow with very very light grey markings on them (assuming that is due to him being spangle?)
 

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Single Factor Spangle Greywing Dark Green.
The dilution of his body colour isn't high enough for a dilute at his age.
If he were a dilute, his cheek patches would have been a lot lighter in colour. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks all :)
I don't quite understand the single factor/double factor thing lol but that's okay, I do like to know what mutations my birds are though :)
I think he is pretty in any case ;)
 

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thanks all :)
I don't quite understand the single factor/double factor thing lol but that's okay, I do like to know what mutations my birds are though :)
I think he is pretty in any case ;)
There's no doubt that he's pretty!

This topic relates to the genetic makeup for mutations. I'll try to be as simple as I can; and I know this will be long and boring, so kindly bear with me, and I hope I can explain it well.

A single Factor of a mutation describes a budgie exhibiting a mutation due to a heterozyguous set of chromosomes, exhibiting the dominant trait over the recessive one.Double factor of a mutation is the pure form of that mutation, containing homozygous alleles, and thus exhibiting the mutation without any recessive mutation's presence.

To make it simpler, If you went to a market and Banana is your favourite fruit...and you see 2 boxes, one containing bananas and the other containing oranges.You will however, notice the banana and the oranges, but you want the banana, so that's what you will see more.

Whereas if you go to a store which has 2 boxes, and all the boxes have only bananas, the store will be a banana shop. No oranges.

So a Single factor of a mutation implies that a budgie carries 2 different mutations' genes but exhibits the dominant one, and the double factor term implies the budgie is purely that one mutation with respect to the mutation concerned (since we know that budgies can exhibit separate mutations at once).

However, most mutations, whether single or double factor, look the same. For example, you will probably not know if a normal budgie is a single Factor Normal or a Double Factor Normal....because both will look the same, but genetically, the Double Factor normal is purely normal, whereas a single Factor normal "could be" a budgie exhibiting the Normal mutation, while being split for (or carrying in hidden form) the gene for Recessive Pied.

So to use simple notations, the allele for Normal is N and for Recessive Pied is r.

NN is a double factor Normal (or a pure Normal) whereas a Nr is a budgie who is normal and is split for Recessive Pied. However since Recessive Pied is recessive to Normal, Normal mutation hides it and shows up instead. (We use Capital letter to stress on the Dominant mutation and small caps to stress on Recessive mutations, to determine which mutation the bird will exhibit. The dominant trait hides the recessive, so the dominant trait is expressed)

BUT there are certain mutations which exhibit differently depending on te number of alleles present. These include:Yellowface Mutants, Goldenface, Spangle, Dark Factor, Dominant Pied, Anthracite, Gray, Easley clearbody, Violet Factor and some more I can't recall at the moment.

In the case for the mutations above, a Single Factor and a Double Factor of those mutations will look different.

In the case of Spangles, Single Factor Spangle (usually a Spangle split for Normal) will not show normal markings, but exhibit the spangle pattern on the wings which appear "inverted" (not the right word)...but this bird is not a homozygous, or purely Spangle.Whereas a Double Factor spangle would appear completely White or Yellow depending on the base colour lacking any sort of marking or colour on the body.

In this case using simple notations, a Single Factor spangle split for Normal would be Sn, whereas a Double Factor Spangle would have the alleles SS (S for Spangle and n for recessive Normal)

The very same way, the Presence of a Dark Factor will give you a Dark Green or Cobalt Budgie (Single Dark Factor) and a Double Dark Factor budgie would be Olive or Mauve. Skyblue and Light Green have no dark factor present, as in, no effect of the Dark Factor mutation exists on them.So we say that Skyblue and Light Greens are Double Light Factor birds, since then it is easier to relate to the Dark Factor.

So genetically, Light factor (let's use l) is recessive to Dark Factors (let's use D)

ll = purely light factor birds (Skyblue or Light Green) [Double Light Factor]
Dl = Single Dark Factor (Cobalt or Dark Green)
DD = Double Dark Factor (Mauve or Olive)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
thanks Rashu and thanks Julio's mum :)
 
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