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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of my babies is a yf1 sky blue dominant pied. However, he hasn't a white feather anywhere besides the spot on the back of his head and his flights. He looks like a clearflight. Were I to have bought him in a pet shop, I would've assumed he was a clearflight. Is there a way to differentiate between a poorly marked dominant pied and a clearflight?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Dominant pieds do have clear flights, but they also usually have (in my birds' cases) a clear band across their bellies. This one doesn't.
 

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That's true, but they can also have "broken" bands that don't really look like bands, like it says on that site.
I'm actually trying to figure out myself if my Lemon is a clearflight pied because his new flight feathers coming in are much lighter in color (almost see through) compared to his body feathers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That's true, but they can also have "broken" bands that don't really look like bands, like it says on that site.
I'm actually trying to figure out myself if my Lemon is a clearflight pied because his new flight feathers coming in are much lighter in color (almost see through) compared to his body feathers.
Yes, I know. This bird's dad is a dominant pied. 3 ofnits siblings are dominant pied. As is he. My ? remains "Is there a way to tell the difference between a poorly marked dominant pied (like my chick) and clearflights?".
 

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I have a chick that has a dom pied Mom and a normal violet grey Dad... he has a tiny mark on the back of his head but other than that looks like normal ... he also has clear flights... his brother is a dom pied and his 2 sisters are lutinos.
 

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With a bird like you have described you can't be sure without breeding. I have bred several dominant pieds that have no clear areas anywhere but the back of the head and the flight feathers
 

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From your description with out a visual
I'd say a poorly marked Dominant Pied

I had one a while back
Did not even have clear flights - but I got Dominant Pied babies from him- his mate was a spangle and NOT dominant pied(or any other pied)




as a wee baby :)


the only "pied' mark he had- was this tiny tiny clear spot on the back of his head


This was from their second clutch 1st clutch gave me a normal and a violet spangle(Apollo)





2 pieds, 1 normal and mom
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks Nev. That's what I had figured.

ATV, I know he is a dominant pied. His dad is dominant pied. My question was about telling the difference between the two pieds. I wasn't sure if breeding was the only answer. I must not be making much sense tonight. Hand raising 15 babies has clearly affected my communication abilities. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If neither parent is a clear flight pied then he can't be one - They can not be split to clear flight pied

Yes, I know. That was not my question. I KNOW he is a dominant pied. However, were it that I bought him in a pet store and didn't know his parentage, I would've thought him to be a clearflight. Which is why Nev said he would have to be bred to discover he was, instead, a dominant pied.
 

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One of my babies is a yf1 sky blue dominant pied
However, were it that I bought him in a pet store and didn't know his parentage
I am confused is he a baby from your adult birds or Did you actually buy him at a pet store?

and a picture would be really helpful

but if he is your very own baby that you bred from your adults, and neither parent is clear flight pied then you have your answer on what he is
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Oh my. Okay. Let me try again. :) A picture is not needed because I am not confused on what he is. He is a dominant pied, just like his dad. However, he has no clear areas except for his flights and a spot on the back of his head. My question was hypothetical. I was saying, had I bought him in a store, I would have thought he was a clearflight pied due to the lack of clear markings anywhere but his flights and head. So, the only way I would know (in my hypothetical situation) that he was a dominant pied is if I were to breed him. That's it.

Unless, there's something I don't know about pieds. How donyou get a clear flight? My baby's dad is a SF dominant pied. So he can make normals and dominant pieds only, right? He can't produce clear flights.
 

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I just thought about something. Do any other mutations have light irises? that could be a good acid test. Then again, maybe I'm making that up. What made me think of that is that I just brought a gorgeous violet home, and she has light irises. Which is what gave me the idea, because she doesn't appear pied. However, she is not violet all over. She has cobalt areas. Could the violet... be pied...? or something?
 

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Yes, I know. This bird's dad is a dominant pied. 3 of its siblings are dominant pied. As is he. My ? remains "Is there a way to tell the difference between a poorly marked dominant pied (like my chick) and clearflights?".
To answer your question, it can be hard to tell the difference between dominant pieds and clearflight pieds. Especially if they are poorly marked, and don't adhere very well to what is expected.

From what I have been able to learn, if there is no distinct clear belly band, to indicate that a bird is a dominant pied, then the next thing to look for is if there is a smudgy clear area below the neck. Then it might be a clearflight pied.

But if it has neither of those, then you would have to breed it to figure it out. And if it throws more poorly marked offspring that look the same, then you still don't know.

One suggestion would be to try to breed some dark eyed clears from it, because if you are successful, then you know it wasn't dominant pied. (But unless the original bird is already split for recessive pied, then it will be a multi-generational project to breed some DECs.)

And the prospect of future test breeding would not help you if you were hypothetically standing in a pet store deciding whether to buy a particular bird or not.

One thing that could help, but not conclusively, would be to look at the other birds for sale with the bird in question. If there were obvious dominant pieds, or if there were obvious clearflight pieds and dark eyed clears, then it could be possible that any given bird for sale with them could be related. (But that would just be guessing, and if both kinds were present, you would be back to square one.)

So I guess the short answer would be No, sometimes you can't tell.
 

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Oh my. Okay. Let me try again. :) A picture is not needed because I am not confused on what he is. He is a dominant pied, just like his dad. However, he has no clear areas except for his flights and a spot on the back of his head. My question was hypothetical. I was saying, had I bought him in a store, I would have thought he was a clearflight pied due to the lack of clear markings anywhere but his flights and head. So, the only way I would know (in my hypothetical situation) that he was a dominant pied is if I were to breed him. That's it.

Unless, there's something I don't know about pieds. How donyou get a clear flight? My baby's dad is a SF dominant pied. So he can make normals and dominant pieds only, right? He can't produce clear flights.
Ok what is the mom? It only takes 1 parent to be a clear flight pied to produce clear flight pieds. when figuring out what mutations a baby is you have to use Both parents not just one to get the proper mutation.

And if he only has clear flight feathers and a Spot on the back of his head How far down do the Wing markings come? on most(not all though) clear flight pieds the markings will come all the way down the wings and stop at the flight feathers- leaving them clear of any markings
where as a dominant pied usually(again not always) only has about Half of their wings with markings while the rest is clear

and we asked for a picture because most of us are better with a Visual to go with the question instead of just a written out description

but for the most part when the birds follow the rules and their descriptions match them the way it should ..
this is from the world- budgerigar website it is what they go by for each mutation

CLEARFLIGHT SKYBLUE (LIGHT BLUE)
General body colour: rump, breast, flanks and underparts deep skyblue of an even depth of colour throughout without any breaks or patches of variegation.
Mask: white, ornamented by six evenly spaced large round black throat spots, the outer two being partially covered by the base of the cheek patches. The white of the mask extending over the frontal and crown, to merge with the black undulations at the back of the head. The frontal and crown should be clear and free from all markings.
Head patch: white at back of head.
Markings:
on cheeks, back of head, neck and wings; black with a well-defined white edge. All markings should be free from any intrusion of body colour.
Cere: blue in cocks, brown in hens.
Eyes: black with a white iris.
Cheek patches: violet.
Primary wing flights: seven visible white feathers in each wing. Primary tail feathers: white.
Feet and legs:
blue/grey mottled or fleshy pink.
DOMINANT PIED SKYBLUE (LIGHT BLUE)
General body colour: rump, breast, flanks and underparts deep skyblue of an even depth of colour throughout but broken with no more than a maximum of 50% of total body colour area by irregular patches of white or with a white band around its middle just above the thighs. Mask: white, ornamented by six evenly spaced large round black throat spots, the outer two being partially covered by the base of the cheek patches. The white of the mask extending over the frontal and crown, to merge with the black undulations at the back of the head. The frontal and crown should be clear and free from all markings.
Head patch:
white at back of head.
Markings: on cheeks, back of head, neck and wings; black with a well-defined white edge but having irregular patches of white or with part of the leading edge of the wing up to the shoulder white on an otherwise normally marked wing. Wing markings may be grizzled in appearance. All markings should be free from any intrusion of body colour.
Cere: blue, fleshy pink or a mixture of both in cocks, brown in hens. Eyes: black with a white iris.
Cheek patches: violet.
Primary wing flights: white.
Primary tail feathers: white. Feet and legs: blue/grey mottled, fleshy pink or a mixture of both.
 
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