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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!! We have a pair of one dominant pied split recessive and a recessive pied **** who is split opaline. The have had 2 clutches in the last two years and raised 8 chicks half have turned out recessive pied and half dominant were not sure if any were combos. What I'm wondering is why none were normal? Was it just chance or do they not have the normal gene for wing patterns. Also how is the normal inherited? Also two of chicks appeare to be grey wings.
Parents
Bell- dominant pied, split recessive, sky blue, single factor violet.


Piper- recessive pied, sky blue, split opaline


Chicks
Jasper


Lace


Peter Pan


Chance

Zeus


Tink

Romeo


Apollo

Sorry some of the pics arent the best!
 

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The expected result from pairing a dominant pied split recessive pied to a recessive pied would be:
25% dominant pied
25% recessive pied
25% combination of dominant pied and recessive pied
25% normal

It could take a lot more than two clutches before your percentages are the same as the expected percentages but you should get normals eventually

The reason you get normals is that a single factor dominant pied has one dominant pied gene and one normal gene (both are dominant over the recessive pied gene)

Romeo and Tink could be combinations but you would need breeding results to be sure

Sometimes the markings on pieds are slightly grey because the dark melanin that is affected by the pied mutation is reduced unevenly. If they were very grey your pair could also both be split for greywing
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The reason you get normals is that a single factor dominant pied has one dominant pied gene and one normal gene (both are dominant over the recessive pied gene)

Sometimes the markings on pieds are slightly grey because the dark melanin that is affected by the pied mutation is reduced unevenly. If they were very grey your pair could also both be split for greywing
I'm a little confused on how the dominant pied and recessive pied genes act with each other. How can dominant pied be dominant over recessive pied and you still get combos. Are they effecting the same gene?

Also do the markings normal get darker with age since Romeo is very light! Sorry for all the questions!! And thanks Nev you have already been very helpful!!!:D
 

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A dominant mutation does not mean that it will cover every other mutation. Dominant means that the mutation will be visible if it is present and it can't be carried in a split form. It only requires one copy of the gene for the mutation to be visible

Recessive mutations will be visible if the bird has two copies of the gene but will be hidden (split) if the bird has only one copy of the gene

Two (or more) mutations can show on the same bird provided the genes for the different mutations are in different places
 
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