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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ever since i got butch, he has had these slightly pink feathers on the bottom of one wing. unfortunately the only time you can see them are when he lifts his wings to stretch, so i couldnt get a pic. the pink is very light but you can tell its there. i do have one flight feather and i was looking at it and i could just barely see a little bit of pink on it. is this a mutation? he is fine health wise if that makes a difference :eek:

i have seen this pic before (rights go to the owner) and i dont know if that is natural of from a mineral block (the keets at the per store had pink feathers because of a mineral block. i went there later on a some had bright red feathers by the cere, but there was no mineral block, have no clue why they had red feathers :S)

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
well then i have no clue why he has pink on his wing. maybe i will ask the avian specialist who clips his wings and she can look at it :eek:
 

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Pink---

Hi, very new pin feathers can look pink. Bourkes grass parakeets have peach/ pink feather:budgie:s but not English/American type. Areas along the edge of wing are often injured from bumping into stuff and can show a bit of pink blood.

Blessings
Jo Ann:budgie:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·


Does he have any mineral blocks, perches, toys, anything that's pink or red?
he only has a cuttle bone and the rest are just natural things, nothing is pink.

Brown perches can also colour his head a little pink though. Just guessing.
he only has wood and plastic perches :eek:

Hi, very new pin feathers can look pink. Bourkes grass parakeets have peach/ pink feather:budgie:s but not English/American type. Areas along the edge of wing are often injured from bumping into stuff and can show a bit of pink blood.

Blessings
Jo Ann:budgie:
there seems to be a little confusion, this pink spot is under his wing, not on his head.

This is Lenny but it is the only pic i found to show where it is on butch.
same spot but on the right (?) wing. it has been there since i got him in december.
 

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Pink---

Hi, There are some breeders that ID birds with red/pink color that gradually fades over time. I have seen this in photos mainly in places like Middle East.

Breeders I know use marking pen usually on back but the red could be under the wing. There is no known natural pink on Budgies save new pin feathers or injuries.

Blessings,

Jo Ann:budgie:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
thanks! i will look into that :D
 

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Over last 5 million years the wild budgies with red, orange, pink colours had been weeded out by falcons, because they stand out against green, brown surroundings.

Budgies are related to lorikeets & lories which had red, pink, orange colours.

5 million years ago when climate in Australia had became dry and numbers of flowering plants decreased, replaced by grasses, the lorikeets had a hard time trying to surivie, but the smaller lorikeets switched from flowers, to seeds and started to eat the seed heads of grasses, these lorikeets and early budgies had red, pink, orange colours.
Seaval genes of lorikeets were eating seeds, but their grizzards cannot deal with seeds and grits very well, so lorikeets were going toward extinction & fell prey to falcons, but before they became extinct, their mutation lorikeet chicks arrived against lorikeet chicks, and the lorikeets bred for first time, cared for mutation chicks, and taught the juveniles to eat seeds and flowers, but mutation chicks wants seeds and not interested in flowers, to their lorikeet parents"s dismay. So they drove their mutation chicks away.
The mutation chicks were wild budgies and as climate became drier, with grasses became plentliful. Budgies"s grizzards can deal with seeds and hard foods as tree barks.
Lorikeets became extinct, but their future geneations...WILD BUDGIES surivied and increase their numbers. The falcons find budgies much more difficult to hunt & catch than lorikeets, but seaval years the falcons learnt to hunt the budgies.
The wild budgies with red, orange, pink colours were chased & caught by falcons, but mutation budgies withOUT red, orange, pink colours were not been caught as they are not eye-catching. Mutation budgies surivied and increase their numbers, while budgies with red, pink, orange colour became extinct, along with their DNA for red, orange, pink colours. This left green, black, yellow budgies remained alive and carry on surivied to today.

The purple cheek patches and wing stripes, intelligence, playness are reminder of lorikeets.

If you look at budgies DNAs to look for red, pink, orange genes, it will be like finding a pin in a hay stake, so 1 or 2 budgies against thousand millions budgies, have red, pink, orange colours. With no genes for red, orange, pink colours, there is no way we will have pink, red, orange budgies in future.

Hybridize the budgies with Bourke's parrots, may not produce healthy chicks.

There is nothing we can do to breed pink, orange, red budgies.


Lorikeets, 6 million years ago when Australia climate similar to today New Guinea climate. Eat fruits and flowers. Started to produce mutation lorikeets, when climate started to dry. Purplish blue heads, with red caps.


Mutation lorikeets (early budgies), 5 million years ago when Australia climate started to dry, with disappeance of fruiting & flowering trees. Eat seeds of grasses (become available to early budgies). Falcons becoming common.
Still had red underwings.


Today's budgies, 5 million years later, lost all red colours, through weeded out of existance by falcons. Eat seeds. Falcons common.

Once genes for red, orange, pink colours are lost, cannot be replaced.
 

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pink

Hi, Thank you for very interesting and informative post. I have wondered but never did the research as in depth as this. I also have Bourkes grass parakeets and I really enjoy their sweet personalities and beautiful colors. I appreciate the wisdom of nature and the contrasts among God's living jewels.This should be a sticky.

Blessings,

Jo A:budgie:nn
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
sooo, in other words there is no possible way Butch has lorikeet genes? that would be cool, but very unlikely. i am going with the idea that his breeder marked his wing. i tryed to look up breeder markings, but it just comes up thinking i was searching parakeet marking (mutations) :(
 
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