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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
These are my 4 budgies!
They are bonded couples and I hope soon to see them in the section ''Breeding Journals''! :)

Please correct me if i am wrong about their mutations...Thanks in advance!

So here we are

Plato- Is he a normal dark green..?



Lora- Is she an opaline dominant pied light green..?(The markings in feathers are more black than brown...so i think she is not a cinnamon!)



Toby-Is he an opaline spangle gray green...?



Zebra- Is she a cinnamon violet?



And here some better and sweet shots(in my opinion)as couples!!!:)

Toby and Sappho



Plato and Lora

 

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I think Plato is a normal light green.

My Jonah (1st 2 pictures) is a normal light green.

My Forrest and Jenny (last 2 pictures) are opaline dark green and recessive pied dark green.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I think Plato is a normal light green.

My Jonah (1st 2 pictures) is a normal light green.

My Forrest and Jenny (last 2 pictures) are opaline dark green and recessive pied dark green.
Thanks for the reply Susan!Lovely green series birdies!!!:budgie:

I also thought that Plato is a light green,but after getting Lora(opaline d pied light green) and got them in the same cage,i realized that he is a bit darker than her!!!
Could you see that in the last pic,where there are both?
 

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I agree with Susan, he looks like a light green too me too, the others look like what you said :)

Opaline is actually a diluting mutation, although not as muh as greywing, cinnamon etc which is usually around 50%. Often an opalines will be up to 10% diluted in body color, and when next to another nonduted bird of the same shade it is more noticeable :)

I do think there is a chance that Plato could also be carrying a Sf violet factor. His cheek patches look a bit dark for a normal light green and he does look like he might be a little darker than normal for a light green, but not as dark as a dark green as many single factor violet light greens do :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Thank you Lindsey!

Opaline is actually a diluting mutation, although not as muh as greywing, cinnamon etc which is usually around 50%. Often an opalines will be up to 10% diluted in body color, and when next to another nonduted bird of the same shade it is more noticeable :)
I have not heard before about the dilution in an opaline!!!Very helpful comment of yours!

I do think there is a chance that Plato could also be carrying a Sf violet factor. His cheek patches look a bit dark for a normal light green and he does look like he might be a little darker than normal for a light green, but not as dark as a dark green as many single factor violet light greens do :)
Brilliant!!!!

I have read that the violet could be visible on the body feathers near the feet and vent of a green budgie with violet factor,but in Plato's case that is not visible at all...So probably he is not carrying violet?Am I wrong?
 

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Thank you Lindsey!

Your welcome! :)

I have not heard before about the dilution in an opaline!!!Very helpful comment of yours!

No problem! Many people dont realize because it is not very obvious if you don't have a bird to compare :)

Brilliant!!!!

I have read that the violet could be visible on the body feathers near the feet and vent of a green budgie with violet factor,but in Plato's case that is not visible at all...So probably he is not carrying violet?Am I wrong?
You are correct, many times if there is any visual difference in the body color it is near the vent/legs like here: Help To Identify Violet Green

However this is not always the case and not all violet greens have this tinge of color. Here are some notes from my mutation guide about violet green :)

Budgie Mutation And Color Guide
Many violet light green budgies are mistaken for dark green, and many dark green violets for olives because the violet gene darkens and intensifies the body color.

Sometimes the only way to be sure if a green is carrying a violet factor is to breed it to a blue so the violet can be seen clearly. If the green bird is split for blue you will get about 50% blues, if the green is not split for blue a second breeding of the chicks to blue mates will be needed to produce blue chicks so that the violet (or lack there of) can be seen.

Green chicks that are split for blue before their first molt will have a similar blue tinge around the vent and legs, regardless of being violet or not, which often goes away after they molt. Look for the tinge after the first molt when trying to determine if the bird is actually a violet green in these cases.
 
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