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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi!

I have a general question today, if anyone is willing to share any info with me.
I have my Gypsy bird, who is some sort of dilute mutation, I would think, with
her faintly patterned, almost white wings, pale lavender-grey belly. and white
tail feathers. I wish I could provide pictures, but alas, have no camera.

Today I ran into my first cinnamon budgie. Oh, she was beautiful! A sky blue
cinnamon recessive pied. Pictures just don't do their beauty justice! I
understand that cinnamon is also a dilute color.

I have with me 4 double dilute rough collies, also known as white merles,
created by combining the merling gene from both parents, resulting in
mostly white dogs. All are blind, and 3 are mostly deaf as a direct result
of their breeders doubling up on the dilute/merle gene. I understand
collie genetics fairly well, but not budgie. Does something like this
happen with budgies as well? If I theoretically paired the cinnamon with
my Gypsy -- dilute whatever she is -- are there genetic disasters waiting to
happen? Are there any other color pairing no-no's to learn about? I
didn't breed these dogs, merely adopted them, but I don't want to have
any part in bringing more genetically challenged creatures into the
world if it can be avoided.

Thank you for any information!
 

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Member of the Month January 2009
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It sounds like Gipsy is a dilute. The dilute mutation is recessive to both greywing & clearwing, which are both recessive to normal.

The type of genetic blindness that occurs in dogs doesn't happen in budgies. But we should all avoid breeding from any bird (or animal) that has any genetic defect
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It sounds like Gipsy is a dilute. The dilute mutation is recessive to both greywing & clearwing, which are both recessive to normal.

The type of genetic blindness that occurs in dogs doesn't happen in budgies. But we should all avoid breeding from any bird (or animal) that has any genetic defect
Thank you for sharing your knowledge with me. I was horrified to realize that
there was the potential of perhaps recreating the dogs problems with the birds
through my ignorance. I'm glad to know that particular disaster can't happen
with the birds, but it certainly illustrates that I need to learn a lot more before
I consider breeding :)
 

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Member of the Month January 2013
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So what are some things that would be considered a genetic defect? Is ino a genetic defect that should be avoided?
Rick
 

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Member of the Month January 2009
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So what are some things that would be considered a genetic defect? Is ino a genetic defect that should be avoided?
Rick
Blindness, deformed beaks, missing toes, crooked feet, unable to fly, not growing tail feathers, etc. etc. etc.

Continual inbreeding will cause genetic defects

Ino is a healthy mutation that just alters the colour
 
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