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So I am very interested in genetics and have been doing a lot of research, both here on TB and on the internet, and have often heard that two budgies, niether of which have normal stripes or are split for normal (as far as I can tell)
can still produce normal chicks.

single factor spangle x single factor spangle
- 25% normal
- 50% single factor spangle
- 25% double factor spangle
So do all budgies carry the normal gene? Because that is how they are in the wild, and how they were originally, do they all have a kind of 'default' to normal? or am I overthinking?
 
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Only the double factor mutations would dominate the normal genes.

For instance, a double factor spangle mates to a normal will produce all SPANGLES and no NORMALS.

Similarly, a double factor dominant pied mates to a normal will produce all DOMINANT PIEDS and no NORMALS.

All single factor mutations would have a normal gene in its genetics. Sex-linked mutations would have a different story due to the fact that hens can only be produced visually with a single sex-linked gene and not in split form while cocks have to get 2 sex-linked genes to produce visually.
 

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Genes come in pairs and the chicks get one of each pair of genes from each parent (This applies to all their genes not just the ones that control their color)

Single factor spangles have one spangle gene and one normal so if two single factor spangles are mated together about 25% of the chicks will inherit a normal gene from each parent and no spangle genes

Double factor spangles have two spangle genes so if a double factor spangle is mated to a normal all the chicks will inherit a spangle gene from one parent and a normal gene from the other. These chicks will all be single factor spangle. But if two double factor spangles are paired together there are no normal genes available so all the chicks will be double factor spangle
 

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Hi Alexis. I'm glad Roland and Nev helped you. They are both very good. :)
I've renamed your thread so members will know that your question is about genetics.
 

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Not every bird or gene combination has the potential to produce wild-type babies. However, every bird has two copies of every gene. Each copy is called an allele and both copies together is the gene, though people often get these terms confused. Any individual gets one allele from its mom and one allele from its dad. Depending on whether the gene is dominant, co-dominant, or recessive, the alleles will determine that the bird looks like and what kind of babies it could produce.

In your spangle example, the spangle allele is what's called dominant, meaning that you only need one copy for the bird to be spangled. In your example, both parents have one spangled allele and one "normal" allele. So some of the babies will get two "normal" alleles, will look normal, and will have no ability to pass on spangled alleles.

If a bird has two spangle alleles (a double factor spangle), then it has no ability to produce wild-type babies. It has no "normal" allele.
 
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