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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had five chicks. One is a white based budgie which I believe is a Pied, and the other four chicks are all Lutinos. The father is a clearwing with normal color and the mother is a Lutino. Both are yellow based of course.
I tried to understand budgie genetics by reading many articles. I even used some popular genetic calculators for budgies. The results don't match up. I am not supposed to have Lutinos with this much probability. I also shouldn't have a blue budgie from yellow based budgies.
How do I have four Lutinos and one white based budgie? The probability doesn't match up.
 

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Probabilities are averages across broad populations, so it’s most likely the probabilities won’t add up unless you bred the same pair over and over until you had a large enough sample size to get the same averages. So it’s very possible.

Additionally green-series is dominant to blue-series so it’s perfectly possible to get blue chicks from a green pair if both are split to blue, which is relatively common.

We’d love to see photos of your little ones if you get a chance!
 

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What we know based on the breeding results are that both of your birds are split to blue and that’s why you have a white/blue baby. If the baby is pied, in all likelihood the ino gene from the Lutino is covering pied mutation. As for having so many Lutino, it could also be possible that the male is split to ino and so increases your probability of ino chicks.
 

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What we know based on the breeding results are that both of your birds are split to blue and that’s why you have a white/blue baby. If the baby is pied, in all likelihood the ino gene from the Lutino is covering pied mutation. As for having so many Lutino, it could also be possible that the male is split to ino and so increases your probability of ino chicks.
To clarify, Ino is sex-linked, so for any chicks to be ino at all the male must be split and the ino chicks are all girls, if neither of the parents are ino.
 

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Ooh! Completely forgot about that! It’s been awhile since I’ve looked into ino. I stand corrected. So both parents are split blue and dad is split ino and mom is ino and that is in fact the reason why there are so many ino chicks! So that’s why OP must be confused as to why so many are ino, because unknowingly the father carrying the gene would mean no ino babies. Thank you!
 

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Ooh! Completely forgot about that! It’s been awhile since I’ve looked into ino. I stand corrected. So both parents are split blue and dad is split ino and mom is ino and that is in fact the reason why there are so many ino chicks! So that’s why OP must be confused as to why so many are ino, because unknowingly the father carrying the gene would mean no ino babies. Thank you!
Yep, that's right. There's no way for chicks to be visually ino if only the mother is unless the father is also split! So since the father is split ino and the mother is ino, then you can get both male and female ino chicks whereas just having the ino mother would mean all males are split and none are visual.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Probabilities are averages across broad populations, so it’s most likely the probabilities won’t add up unless you bred the same pair over and over until you had a large enough sample size to get the same averages. So it’s very possible.

Additionally green-series is dominant to blue-series so it’s perfectly possible to get blue chicks from a green pair if both are split to blue, which is relatively common.

We’d love to see photos of your little ones if you get a chance!
Okay I understand fully well what you mean. I understand how probabilities work and how the numbers only start to get accurate once you have a large enough sample. I judged based on an extremely small sample, thanks for correcting me.


Ooh! Completely forgot about that! It’s been awhile since I’ve looked into ino. I stand corrected. So both parents are split blue and dad is split ino and mom is ino and that is in fact the reason why there are so many ino chicks! So that’s why OP must be confused as to why so many are ino, because unknowingly the father carrying the gene would mean no ino babies. Thank you!
So from what I understand, Dad carries genes for both blue and ino, and mother carries the same two genes too. Both are split for ino and blue. The mother is visually ino, hence the reason for a blue chick and 4 inos. Am I understanding this correctly? I bought the birds from a local shop, and shops like these do not keep a record of the parents and ancestry. I should really get my birds from a reputable breeder.

Yep, that's right. There's no way for chicks to be visually ino if only the mother is unless the father is also split! So since the father is split ino and the mother is ino, then you can get both male and female ino chicks whereas just having the ino mother would mean all males are split and none are visual.
This really clarifies some of my other questions about budgie genetics too. My cage literally feels like I have a bunch of live bananas flying around. I have 5 inos, one clearwing, and one blue Pied.

I'll stick with this combo, makes my flock feel somewhat unique.

Some pictures
Hand Finger Beak Amphibian Bird

Bird Vertebrate Beak Fence Parrot

Bird Eye Parrot Beak Parakeet

Bird Photograph Vertebrate Light Black

In the last picture, the mother (Pika) was hanging upside down on the right side, could not capture her in the shot. The youngest chick is 5 weeks old who is sitting on that food tray. This one loves cilantro so much she will not eat even from the parent's mouth and will go play and nibble the stem and leaves.
I'm thinking of getting them toys and a swing, hope these little fellas enjoy their lives.
 

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