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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The back of my house is being redone and a nest of baby robins was knocked down that was up under the eaves of my house. I had heard them crying for the last few days (constantly) but didn't hear them today so we figured they had died so we went ahead with fixing things. Well now I have 3 babies and an egg. Their crops were empty completely and they were weak and dehydrated and grayish. SO.....now (a few hours later) they have been syringe fed a mix and have full crops (this has been done 4 times so far) and no one near me will take them. They are looking better and more active and are pink now and not as dehydrated looking. I found some robins in my backyard that my dog had probably killed at some point so I'm guessing that is why the babies were crying and in poor condition. So....what do I do now?? One or two of them have their eyes open already but barely any down on them....the egg...well...it's an egg....I don't have an incubator. Do the chicks need a heat source? I've raised baby wild birds before....but they were sparrows and a black bird and not from this very young age. thanks in advance.
 

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Keep them warm and dry, I would line their makeshift "nest" with a blanket. You're doing really well feeding them! Once they're past danger of dying and not as delicate, I would call a wildlife rescue center and see if they'll take them. Since they were so young, they won't know how to survive in the wild. Also, unless you have an incubator, the egg is probably not going to hatch.

Or you could keep them, if that's not illegal where you live. :rolleyes:

Aluz has experience with raising young birds, maybe she can give you some other pointers.

I'm so glad the chicks are ok--I'm glad they survived from so young an age! Karma for being such a good surrogate parent. Incidentally, today I went for a walk and saw three fledgeling robins (all separately) who didn't make it. I wish I could have done something, and it makes me feel better that you found some chicks who could have been facing the same fate and you helped them :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have them in a nest box that I wasn't using and lined it with carefresh bedding. I have it in a warm part of my house and they seem to be staying warm. I have the egg with them still (just in case) but will probably have to get rid of it in a day or so, so that the other babies don't get sick if it is a bad egg. I candled it and couldn't see through it at all. They are full and warm and happy and asleep for the night. I will share pics tomorrow and keep y'all updated. :) We aren't really supposed to keep wild birds (but everywhere I called said they would not take them and that I should put them under a bush....there aren't any near my house and we all know they would die).....but I can build them a big cage I guess and keep them if they are that tame...and/or keep trying to find someone. I have a pigeon that I rescued 3 years ago from the barn where my horses were boarded. Plus my budgies that I have lol!! Our first budgie was one that we found in our yard...and my son brought her in. Never seen a wild budgie in Tx before. lol!
 

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I'm glad you took in these chicks and are giving them a second chance at life.
You seem to have all bases covered so far. Since we now have Summer weather it's easier to keep the chicks warm.
While I was raising my few days old goldfinch I also put the little chick on a spare budgie's nest box and I enveloped the nest box with a small fleece blanket. As my little one feathered up and was able to maintain body heat, I removed the blanket.
This is going to be a long journey and I wish you the very best of luck in raising these chicks. As they grow more you may want to add a diet appropriate to their needs, given the fact in the wild they are mainly insectivores and eat little worms, grasshoppers, berries etc. You could get them mealworms and other insects.
When I was taking care of a nightingale I managed to trap some insects for him to eat and also got mealworms, fortunately my insectivore bird was with me for a short amount of time until he regained his strength and use of his legs and was released back into the wild.

I also know how frustrating it is to not have a place to take these chicks that are abandoned, I have the same problem here because there really aren't wildlife rehab centers near me and the ones I contacted in the past also wouldn't take my rescues. They mainly work with bigger birds, species close to being endangered and other types of wild animals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
From things I have read it says that they can start to have bite sized insects before long. Thankfully, I'm not bothered by having to feed them insects (I own snakes and a lizard as well so gross things don't bother me LOL). And I will do my best to keep them on a diet that they need for them to be healthy and grow properly. The little ones made it through the night and woke me up yelling at me this morning for food LOL!!! Will get pics up here soon.
 

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Jen,

Karma to you for being such a kind and loving person to take in the baby robins and do all you can to ensure they thrive and are healthy. There is a special place in heaven for people like you. :hug:

I'm glad you'll have no problem feeding the babies insects and worms when the time comes. They believe you are their Momma Bird now and you're doing a great job in that role.

It's a same there is no wildlife rescue near you that is willing to help out in situations like this. :(

Do you think when the chicks have fledged and weaned they will be able to be released into the wild or will they need special care always?
 

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Very kind of you to take these little bird's in and save their lives. I hope everything goes well and they continue to thrive. Will be watching for your pic's...:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm trying to handle them as very little as possible BUT I'm not sure if they will be able to be released eventually or if they will always have to stay here with me. This has been a new adventure since I've never hand fed babies this young before lol! The egg was dead sadly.....I checked it today. BUT these 3 little ones are doing great so far and anytime they hear us they want to be fed lol!
 

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Great to hear they are doing well. I know how demanding it is, I raised a baby sparrow and had her for 12 years. When I first found her none of the wildlife rehab places would take her because she was not a species native to the USA. Is there an avian vet near you that you could speak with, sometimes they know of people that care for orphaned wildlife or perhaps a vet from a nearby zoo.
Best of luck with them, hope all continues to go well. Soon you will have to teach them to hunt for worms. lol
 
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