Talk Budgies Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know she is opaline and a yellowface... is she a clearwing as well making her a rainbow?

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Hallo Angel226,

The "correct" description of Rainbow type birds is quite "unclear" to me as well, as the below few websites (with links==> credit goes to those authors!) suggest.

The last website gives probably the "more official description"...but as for as the "YF Opaline Clearwing" bird, shown by you, is concerned (given it's genetic "components") it pretty much qualifies as a "rainbow"...BUT this probably depends if the wing-markings are in line with the "Clear-wing" mutation character...which I'm not certain of (as Robo-Hip noted, it may have the Spangle gene).... colour of tail & wing-flight feathers, etc all however has to be "correct" & to "true rainbow" definitions...

Here are a few photos of what I aspire to when "trying" to breed "proper Rainbows" (having Violet & Dark -factors in addition to the genetics listed as minimum requirements! - CREDIT GOES TO SABRINA KAISER...!.; see her website at:
http://www.vogelzucht-kaiser.de/..)

02_08_2010-Wellis-13_sm.jpg

02_08_2010-Wellis-33-sm.jpg

02_08_2010-Wellis-46-sm.jpg

Here's the "website" descriptions referred to earlier (there are sure many more, all that may vary in subtle ways!):

1) "Rainbows are, as the name implies, a multi-coloured bird. The definition being a Yellow-faced Opaline Whitewing Blue."
==> http://www.budgerigars.co.uk/genetics/peaksp.html

2) "So in a true Rainbow or Goldenface Rainbow we have a bird with a yellow or golden-yellow head and mask; a body colour ranging from Skyblue through to Violet and Mauve, with an area of green of graduating depth of colour where the yellow of the mask blends into the blue of the body feathering; the "V" of the Opaline giving a blue mantle; wings which have an off-white ground, with opalescent blue, green and yellow markings; and off-white or pale grey flight feathers. The long tail feathers are mainly a deep blue, but with lighter areas flushed with yellow. The shorter tail feathers show less of the blue and more of the yellow colour. As would be expected, where the Dark and/or Violet factors are included, most of the colours and markings are correspondingly darker.

Yellowface Blue Mutant 2 and Goldenface Blue can give a greater intensity to all the colours. The Goldenface mutation can even turn some of the markings on the wings into an attractive bronze colour, the nearest to red that we can get."

===> http://www.budgerigars.co.uk/rare/rainbows.html

3) "RAINBOW (composite Opaline Whitewing Yellowface/Goldenface Blue series)

The standard will be as for the Opaline Whitewing Skyblue, Cobalt, Mauve, Violet or Grey except for the following details:

The expression of yellow coloration will vary dependent upon which of the yellowface mutations is visibly present in each case, ie Yellowface Mutant 1 will be lemon yellow, Yellowface Mutant 2 double factor will be buttercup yellow and Goldenface double factor will be deeper yellow. The otherwise white areas of the mask, frontal, crown and the very faintly discernible undulations at the back of the head will be in the shade of yellow coloration appropriate to the Yellowface mutant form.

Markings: on cheeks, back of head and neck will have a light flush of the appropriate shade of yellow visible on the otherwise white areas at the edge of the markings.

Wings: may have a very light flush of the appropriate shade of yellow visible on the otherwise white areas at the edge of minimal body colour markings.

Primary wing flights: grey/white

Primary tail feathers: white

Secondary tail feathers: blueish/grey at the tip, an overlay of the appropriate shade of yellow on the otherwise white areas is permissible.

NOTE:
The notes for the above Yellowface and Goldenface mutations regarding the single factor and double factor should also be applied to the written standard for the Rainbow variety.

The Rainbow is not a proper example of the variety unless it is visibly an Opaline, a Whitewing, a Yellowface or Goldenface.
"

==> http://www.world-budgerigar.org/ , then follow link under "Other Varieties" , selecting link on 3rd column (from left), 2nd row!

Hope this helps!... (but I'm sure this subject is "a bit confusing for most"!)....

I trust ToniC, Nev90, Barrie and other genetic experts will come up with good advice of their own!

Enjoy!
JacodK
 

·
Member of the Month January 2009
Joined
·
3,676 Posts
This bird looks like a rainbow. I'm not absolutely sure but I think that it could be opaline spangle instead of opaline clearwing

Many websites incorrectly call any colorful budgie a "Rainbow" but the official rainbow as defined by the World Budgerigar Organisation is as follows:
RAINBOW (composite Opaline Whitewing Yellowface/Goldenface Blue series)

The standard will be as for the Opaline Whitewing Skyblue, Cobalt, Mauve, Violet or Grey except for the following details:

The expression of yellow coloration will vary dependent upon which of the yellowface mutations is visibly present in each case, ie Yellowface Mutant 1 will be lemon yellow, Yellowface Mutant 2 double factor will be buttercup yellow and Goldenface double factor will be deeper yellow. The otherwise white areas of the mask, frontal, crown and the very faintly discernible undulations at the back of the head will be in the shade of yellow coloration appropriate to the Yellowface mutant form.

Markings: on cheeks, back of head and neck will have a light flush of the appropriate shade of yellow visible on the otherwise white areas at the edge of the markings.
Wings: may have a very light flush of the appropriate shade of yellow visible on the otherwise white areas at the edge of minimal body colour markings.
Primary wing flights: grey/white.
Primary tail feathers: white.
Secondary tail feathers: blueish/grey at the tip, an overlay of the appropriate shade of yellow on the otherwise white areas is permissible.
NOTE

The notes for the above Yellowface and Goldenface mutations regarding the single factor and double factor should also be applied to the written standard for the Rainbow variety.

The Rainbow is not a proper example of the variety unless it is visibly an Opaline, a Whitewing, a Yellowface or Goldenface.
NOTE: Whitewing is another name for a blue series clearwing
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,484 Posts
I would say you do have a rainbow with spangle added. She does look like an opaline, yellow face type two, clear wing, blue series spangle. I have a rainbow that is also dominant pied. Here is a photo of La fiesta.
 

·
DEACTIVATED ACCOUNT
Joined
·
1,414 Posts
Hallo Angel226,

The "correct" description of Rainbow type birds is quite "unclear" to me as well, as the below few websites (with links==> credit goes to those authors!) suggest.

The last website gives probably the "more official description"...but as for as the "YF Opaline Clearwing" bird, shown by you, is concerned (given it's genetic "components") it pretty much qualifies as a "rainbow"...BUT this probably depends if the wing-markings are in line with the "Clear-wing" mutation character...which I'm not certain of (as Robo-Hip noted, it may have the Spangle gene).... colour of tail & wing-flight feathers, etc all however has to be "correct" & to "true rainbow" definitions...

Here are a few photos of what I aspire to when "trying" to breed "proper Rainbows" (having Violet & Dark -factors in addition to the genetics listed as minimum requirements! - CREDIT GOES TO SABRINA KAISER...!.; see her website at:
http://www.vogelzucht-kaiser.de/..)

View attachment 21715

View attachment 21716

View attachment 21717

Here's the "website" descriptions referred to earlier (there are sure many more, all that may vary in subtle ways!):

1) "Rainbows are, as the name implies, a multi-coloured bird. The definition being a Yellow-faced Opaline Whitewing Blue."
==> http://www.budgerigars.co.uk/genetics/peaksp.html

2) "So in a true Rainbow or Goldenface Rainbow we have a bird with a yellow or golden-yellow head and mask; a body colour ranging from Skyblue through to Violet and Mauve, with an area of green of graduating depth of colour where the yellow of the mask blends into the blue of the body feathering; the "V" of the Opaline giving a blue mantle; wings which have an off-white ground, with opalescent blue, green and yellow markings; and off-white or pale grey flight feathers. The long tail feathers are mainly a deep blue, but with lighter areas flushed with yellow. The shorter tail feathers show less of the blue and more of the yellow colour. As would be expected, where the Dark and/or Violet factors are included, most of the colours and markings are correspondingly darker.

Yellowface Blue Mutant 2 and Goldenface Blue can give a greater intensity to all the colours. The Goldenface mutation can even turn some of the markings on the wings into an attractive bronze colour, the nearest to red that we can get."

===> http://www.budgerigars.co.uk/rare/rainbows.html

3) "RAINBOW (composite Opaline Whitewing Yellowface/Goldenface Blue series)

The standard will be as for the Opaline Whitewing Skyblue, Cobalt, Mauve, Violet or Grey except for the following details:

The expression of yellow coloration will vary dependent upon which of the yellowface mutations is visibly present in each case, ie Yellowface Mutant 1 will be lemon yellow, Yellowface Mutant 2 double factor will be buttercup yellow and Goldenface double factor will be deeper yellow. The otherwise white areas of the mask, frontal, crown and the very faintly discernible undulations at the back of the head will be in the shade of yellow coloration appropriate to the Yellowface mutant form.

Markings: on cheeks, back of head and neck will have a light flush of the appropriate shade of yellow visible on the otherwise white areas at the edge of the markings.

Wings: may have a very light flush of the appropriate shade of yellow visible on the otherwise white areas at the edge of minimal body colour markings.

Primary wing flights: grey/white

Primary tail feathers: white

Secondary tail feathers: blueish/grey at the tip, an overlay of the appropriate shade of yellow on the otherwise white areas is permissible.

NOTE:
The notes for the above Yellowface and Goldenface mutations regarding the single factor and double factor should also be applied to the written standard for the Rainbow variety.

The Rainbow is not a proper example of the variety unless it is visibly an Opaline, a Whitewing, a Yellowface or Goldenface.
"

==> http://www.world-budgerigar.org/ , then follow link under "Other Varieties" , selecting link on 3rd column (from left), 2nd row!

Hope this helps!... (but I'm sure this subject is "a bit confusing for most"!)....

I trust ToniC, Nev90, Barrie and other genetic experts will come up with good advice of their own!

Enjoy!
JacodK
Those pics are just stunning! Especially the last one! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So if she is a rainbow. What would be the best mate for her to produce more like her? I have a yellowface type 2 greywing sf violet split for opaline. Would that work?
 

·
Member of the Month January 2009
Joined
·
3,676 Posts
So if she is a rainbow. What would be the best mate for her to produce more like her? I have a yellowface type 2 greywing sf violet split for opaline. Would that work?
Adding greywing is not the best. Also you'd be better to not use a different yellow face type. An opaline clearwing would be best or an opaline dilute would be ok.

If she's spangle you would get some like her if she was mated to an opaline cobalt
 

·
DEACTIVATED ACCOUNT
Joined
·
16,073 Posts
she looks like a CLEAR FLIGHT not a CLEAR WING -
Clearwing budgies have very light or no markings on head and wings and the body color is brightened (not lightened or diluted)
hence the name "clearwing"

a TRUE rainbow as nev said is a Yellow face Opaline CLEAR WING Blue series - they do not consider any other mutation mixed in a Rainbow
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Adding greywing is not the best. Also you'd be better to not use a different yellow face type. An opaline clearwing would be best or an opaline dilute would be ok.

If she's spangle you would get some like her if she was mated to an opaline cobalt[/QUOTE/] Ok thank you.

Would you mind explaining to me why you would not want to use a different yellowface type? What happens or what does it do that makes you not want to use it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,921 Posts
To get the correct mutations are always difficult, but it's a BEAUTIFUL bird. I wish someone can show pictures of clearwings. i know what the "book" says, but it is not so easy to identify them - for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Hi Angel226,

Speaking from the little I've learnt form others (and here at TB).... I think what Nev meant was that because the Mutant II Yellow-face is dominant over the Mutant I YF you may very well be "weakening" the YF Mutant I gene (by combining the YF 1 & Yf II), if that is what your aim is....

...so to get more brilliance of Yellow in the face, use only Golden Face or YF mutant I...else you may loose such brightness (of YF I) by getting Mutant II birds (which turns into a sea-foam green body colour below the face mask...so the bright blue body colour get's lost)....

However it depends what you're after...but getting Double factor (df) birds (from mating 2 single factor birds within the same YF I or YF II type only) has it's advantages when you continue breeding such df birds, in that you're certain to get at least sf yf birds if such df factor bird is paired up with another bird (say not having any yf gene)...so you may wish to add some better/other character from such non-yf bird to the known df yf bird....to improve the ultimate quality of the original "true YF I or GF" bird in its young...

Enjoy trying out the combinations....I'm also going at it (GF, YF 1 & YFII) as a beginner really!

Stay well & good luck with your efforts!
JacodK
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Well... in saying that I have 7 males. I really like the yf birds. I would really like more either like her or similar to her. I would be fine with a opaline spangle "rainbow"

Out of my seven males which would you chose to breed with.

I have a

1 yf dom pied spangle(not sure if he's split),
2 sky blue spangle(maybe dilute, or greywing not sure if he's split anything),
3 normal skyblue(is not split for anything),
4 olive green dominant pied greywing(don't know if he's split blue or anything else)
5 yf II single factor violet greywing(split opaline),
6 Cobolt recessive pied(don't know if he's split for anything),
7 light green spanlge( split for recessive pied and cinnamon).

I do have golden faces but they are both hens.

I also have a difficult time with identifying clear wings so I would love to see pictures!
 

·
Member of the Month January 2009
Joined
·
3,676 Posts
Would you mind explaining to me why you would not want to use a different yellowface type? What happens or what does it do that makes you not want to use it?
Yellow face 1 would be far better in a rainbow unless you could use double factors of either of the other types. The yellow will spread with single factors of both type 2 and golden face and most of the blue area will turn green. As the hen is type 1 if the **** bird was type 2 or golden face you wouldn't get double factors but you'd get a mix of both types and many of the chicks would turn greenish at their first moult.

The two pictures of clearwings that atvchick posted are fairly typical of the clearwings you see these days but when the mutation first appeared the wings were much clearer
 

·
Member of the Month January 2009
Joined
·
3,676 Posts
Well... in saying that I have 7 males. I really like the yf birds. I would really like more either like her or similar to her. I would be fine with a opaline spangle "rainbow"

Out of my seven males which would you chose to breed with.

I have a

1 yf dom pied spangle(not sure if he's split),
2 sky blue spangle(maybe dilute, or greywing not sure if he's split anything),
3 normal skyblue(is not split for anything),
4 olive green dominant pied greywing(don't know if he's split blue or anything else)
5 yf II single factor violet greywing(split opaline),
6 Cobolt recessive pied(don't know if he's split for anything),
7 light green spanlge( split for recessive pied and cinnamon).
It is most important that the **** has opaline genes because if he doesn't none of the chicks will be visibly opaline
 

·
DEACTIVATED ACCOUNT
Joined
·
16,073 Posts
Yellow face 1 would be far better in a rainbow unless you could use double factors of either of the other types. The yellow will spread with single factors of both type 2 and golden face and most of the blue area will turn green. As the hen is type 1 if the **** bird was type 2 or golden face you wouldn't get double factors but you'd get a mix of both types and many of the chicks would turn greenish at their first moult.

The two pictures of clearwings that atvchick posted are fairly typical of the clearwings you see these days but when the mutation first appeared the wings were much clearer
so for an actual rainbow you don't want the yellow bleeding into the blue making it a sea foam green color?
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top