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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so im totally confused here.
ive always thought female budgie had xx chromosomes and a male had xy
and that a sex-linked gene affected the x chromosome so that makes a better chance of producing a female with a sex-linked gene since she has xx and a male has xy.

now i learn budgies are the other way round male being xx and female being xy.

im totally confused..wouldnt that make more male opalines or cinnamons??
 

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In mammals, the female is the homogametic sex, having two X chromosomes (XX), while the male is heterogametic, having one X and one Y chromosome (XY). Genes that are present on the X or Y chromosome are called sex linked genes.

In birds, the opposite is true: the male is the homogametic sex, having two X chromosomes (XX), and the female (hen) is heterogametic, having one X and one Y chromosome (XY).
 

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The sex-linked genes are recessive and on the X-chromosome.

If you have XY (female), then you only need one of the gene (say opaline) for the budgie to be opaline (I don't think that the Y gene affects it, so there's nothing to be dominant over the one X-chromosome if that makes sense).

Males, XX, would need two of the opaline gene for the budgie to be an opaline, so males are less common.

Hope that makes sense.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
right i get it now.
i thought as females only 1 x there would be less chance of being opaline and males having 2 xx's there was more chance of being opaline but i was mistaken.

thanks both:D
 
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