Talk Budgies Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last weekend we got a rescue budgie and I would like her to be looked by a vet. I just made an appointment with a vet but I'm not too sure about well, quite a few things:

1. On another thread I was asked to get bloodwork done and pbfd but when I asked the receptionist about it she had never heard of it. She didn't think that the vet did any blood work unless there was a reason to suspect that the budgie is ill. Well, actually she just kept saying that he does a very thorough check. asked her if he can weigh my budgie and again she wasn't sure if he had a scale. I should have probably asked if I could speak to the vet directly..but well, I felt like I was bothering her with too many questions anyway. I'm almost tempted to look for another avian vet but he's the closest and I can't find anyone else that doesn't involve an hour long car journey, which I don't think my budgie will enjoy.

I don't know what do you think? It's just £27 for the health check so maybe I should just risk it and see what exactly he does.

2. How should I transport the budgie? I've still got the cardboard carrier box in which I brought her home or I could just take her in her quarantine cage, which is quite small anyway. I just think she might be safer in the box though I've got no idea how to get her back inside the box.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,363 Posts
If you keep the appointment with this vet I would ask the vet directly about the blood work. At the very least I think a physical exam and a test on the droppings should be done. Here in the US, at least at my vet, when I bring in a new bird, the blood work is part of the initial visit, that will tell the vet if there are any hidden problems that are not readily apparent on a physical exam. My vet also always weighs the bird(s).
I transport my birds in a little carrier I have, but I have also at times used a small cage.
If your bird is comfortable in the quarantine cage you can transport in that, just make sure you wrap it up well in a blanket so the bird does not get cold, if it is cold where you live.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Cody, I'll do that. I think I'll have to go to the vet on my own so I hope I'll be able to securely fasten the seat belt around the cage and that it won't move too much. I do think that the bird carrier box is the safer option but I don't want to destroy any trust that my little budgie has built up for me so far. Ugggh..i hate making decisions.

I was hoping to get an appointment on Saturday but apparently he doesn't see birds on Saturday. :mad:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes, he's registered on that website as an avian vet and I confirmed it with the receptionist as well. He also treats dogs and cats though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37,562 Posts
Take your budgie in her cage, she will be more comfortable and less stressed. Make sure the cage is covered when taking it out and keep it covered when in the car if needed. Don't have air conditioner on if cold just keep the car at a comfortable temperature. Playing the radio or some music could help as well.
Leave the paper in the bottom of the cage, this way he can examine the droppings for any sign of problems. Take the water out if it is a short amount of time.
Ask questions , you are in the right wanting to know what he will do. Weighing your budgie at home and keeping a record is a great help for future visits. Ask about probiotics these are a must I feel especially for birds with any gut or yeast problems.
Ask him to check the nails, beak, and vent. Good luck and I am sure it will be fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks, pretty boy, will do that. I made an appointment with another vet. Somehow the other one made me really uncomfortable. Maybe I'm unfairly biased since I only spoke to the receptionist rather than the vet but she seemed quite ill informed and uncooperative and also said they wouldn't do any blood tests.

The downside is that this vet is not actually an avian vet but apparently she's got tons of experience with budgies and is the vet the clinic always uses for birds. I think, she mostly sees birds. Do you think that's good enough?

I just feel somehow a lot more confident about this clinic. They are a bit more expensive but they seem a lot more professional and knowledgeable and cooperative. Also, they are much closer so I don't have to subject MF to a long car journey.

Oh..and I was able to get an appointment on Saturday. The other one doesn't work weekends so I'd have to take at least half a day off and I'm just so stupidly busy at the moment. I know that shouldn't be a consideration and I should put my budgie's health first but sigh..I'm pretty sure I'd have had to cancel the other appointment anyway since I just can't get leave on that day. :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37,562 Posts
If you feel more confident and happy to take your budgie to this other vet then I feel you should go ahead. Remember to ask as many questions as possible regarding any issues you may think of. Good luck:budgie:
 

·
Member of the Year 2016//Exceptional Service Award
Joined
·
4,409 Posts
Taking

I agree, use the vet that makes you feel most comfortable. However, sometimes a staff person can ruin the rep of a good vet. My first experience with our vet was not good because of one of the staff. I finally asked to speak with the vet directly. I explained to him my concerns. He said he would take care of it. I did not ask him to discipline the person and they are still employed there, but when I ask for direct contact with the vet I get it.

What you are looking for is mutual respect from vet and staff. Staff tends to be trained to protect or buffer between pet owners and the vet. this is What front desk people do is make decision if your concerns are big enough to interrupt the vet or doctor or lawyer etc. You make a commitment to ask for attention from the vet and ask vet to be available to you in acute issues. It takes a bit of courage, but I am glad I took the extra effort with our vet as we have a good relationship now which could have been lost if I had just gone away feeling uncomfortable about the staff interface. So even if you never go to this vet you might want to let them know so they can improve the front desk process. It is quite possible others may be feeling at odds but not know how to talk it out with the vet honestly. I like to play the game of life so that everybody wins.

Many vets like to see pet parents get more involved with the care of their little ones. My vet now trusts me to do a lot of procedures that are more skilled than the normal person with a sick or injured bird. I always get him to demonstrate then I demonstrate that I can do it and allow for further instructions and getting his approval before I do a procedure on my own. This tells him I have the skill and confidence needed. For example the use of dremmels and cautery on beaks and claws, needs some training before anyone should be turned loose to use one. I can use these tools with confidence, but this is not for someone who is not skilled and confident. These are good tools when used by skilled people like a vet. I started learning on a three sided file from my husbands tool box to reshape a cracked damaged beak. The beak came out looking like it had never been injured and passed inspection from our vet.

:budge::budge: The first step is to face your concerns so that you can inspire trust in your bird. Your budgie will react to your fear. Then be sure you are able to be in charge when you handle your bird no matter how it wiggles. always have a back up person to hold a foot or frisky beak. Be comfortable in the trust circle you-budgie-back up.
Blessings, Jo Ann :budge::budge:
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top