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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Why do people try to sell their adult parrots (all kinds not just budgies) for more or the same that a breeder would charge for a young hand fed baby of the same species? I can't figure it out. :S Of course no one wants your bird; not only are they taking on potential behavioral problems and possibly avian diseases but they get to pay you a mark up rather then getting their bird from a reputable source. I am truly perplexed by this. Yes most of these ads in the avian classified specify bird only also in the same state so cost of living shouldn't be significantly different.
 

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I'm sure there are different school's of thought on the subject. I do agree with your reasoning completely, and would just invest in a new, young bird from a good breeder myself. That said, some people do not want their pet going to someone who is only buying it to get a good deal, or substancially lower price than they would have to pay a breeder, which is admirable really. Then I am sure there are those who just want to try and get every dollar they can, whether they care about the bird or not..:dunno:
 

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A lot of birds can live a long time and they are long time commitments...sometimes an elderly couple would much rather an older bird. Also, its sort of better to adopt the unwanted birdies before encouraging breeders to create more. I see WAY too many abused or unwanted birds coming into my bird shelters I volunteer at just because people don't realize how much work birds are and how long they will last...in a lot of cases they outlive us (depending on the type of bird, your age, and it's) My conures were adopted. So was Ivy one of my little parakeets. Its sometimes not so much paying the markup but giving the bird a second chance at a good life. Randy's got a good point too...they may also want to make sure the people who buy the birds are serious and can/will look after the little guy.


Gah, it breaks my heart when people see behavioral problems in birds and dismiss them and think they are beyond repair. I think those birds need more love and I promise, everything no matter the life- responds to love and attention. Even your houseplants. Captain Hook my Jenday conure was THE worst when i first brought him home. Gave one of my friends stitches and wouldn't let me touch him for months. Now hes a completely different bird. Hes friendly, cuddly and super loyal and sweet. He was badly abused though.
 

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This happens across all species of animals sadly. I hate to say it but we, the so called superior species are the blame.
Be it an unwanted gift, can't be bothered any more, it has grown up and no fun anymore, a gift for a child. It goes on and on. Greed and the chance to make quick money is another.

Sometimes these older birds are so badly neglected or abused just like dogs and other animals it takes care , patience and love often vet treatment is needed as well,to help them heal. Unfortunately these things cost money.
Rehomed or surrounded animals are virtually at their last chance to find love and happiness, we have to be prepared to give them some joy if at all possible. The birds that make it to a shelter are in fact the lucky ones often.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Behavioral issues are a big deal for a lot of people. Not everybody has the lifestyle or time to sort out these problems. There has to be a balance or other wise both people and animals suffer. Isn't that the whole point of rescue groups doing behavioral screening on animals and background checks on people?

I am also not going to help someone make a profit off an animal that has been in less then ideal circumstances nor am I going to take in a bird that I would immediately have to re home because it shows aggression which is something I can't have around a medically vulnerable disabled child whose only ability to cope with aggression would be to lie there and cry. It isn't about devaluing an animal it is about being realistic.
 

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Right, usually at shelters they do go under health screenings and you are allowed to interact with them beforehand to see if the bird is a good fit for your family and lifestyle. As for finding birds in ads...you can still go and see it and see how they are and behave and ask the owner to provide recent vet records of the bird to look over what its health is like.


Also, I have a friend from one of my shelters whom DID respond to an ad and saw that the amazon she went to look at was in terrible conditions...and called animal control. The bird was seized and the owners decided to give it up and the birdy was put into our shelter where she adopted the baby :)
 

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From what I think, is if they are selling their bird at a price much higher than what a breeder would sell a young, healthy bird for, is they are mostly concerned with making money. Many people sell their pretty old cars for real high prices. Or, I should say, they try to sell real high, I do not know how many actual sales they do make.
 

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I get you; maybe people do it to discourage those who aren't serious. OR they don't really know how to price the bird and probably ask for a far fetched price.

However, it most likely is what you originally assumed... They are looking to make great cash and depending on the rarity of the bird... They can get it! I wouldn't deal with those types of people either.

And hope you don't think I assumed you devalued birds with their own issues. I know plenty of other people will read this and am hoping that if they can, and if they are looking for a new feather companion; to look into shelters first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I understand what you are saying. Everything is good. I am looking for a cockatiel because aggression is a huge concern of mine and I want a medium sized bird. I actually found the perfect one that needed a new home a few weeks ago but I wasn't able to take him since I had just brought Tico home. I felt it was important to concentrate on the bird I had already made a commitment to. Tico is now settled and it is time to add one more to the mix. Tico was bought because I needed an active and brightly colored bird my son could watch. This bird is one I am specifically choosing for me although due to my son's limitations both bird will be cared for and socialized by me.
 
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