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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm breeding two of my birds, Willow and Storm. Storm is sitting on three eggs right now and I'm hoping for more. I would like to know what the chicks color mutations will be. Willow is a normal sky blue yellow face type two, he is carrying recessive pied and opaline, he might be carrying SF violet as well. Storm is an opaline sky blue SF grey and violet. She is carrying recessive pied. Thanks



 

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Skyblue SF Violet YF2 split for Rec. Pied male to an Opaline Skyblue SF grey and Violet split for Rec Pied:
50% Skyblues, 50% Cobalts, half will have a Grey factor. 25% Sf Violets, 25% DF Violets, and 50% Normals.
25% Rec Pieds, 25% split for Rec Pied, and 50% Normals.
Half of the chicks will be YF too.
All males will be split for Opaline.
 

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Whatever you do end up with they are going to be very beautiful birds! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the info and the comments. I did forget one miner detail when listing Willows mutations he is split for Opaline can someone please give me the percentage of chick mutations wiht that fact added? Sorry I forgot. Thanks
 

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Okay if he is split for Opaline, you'll get 50% males being Opaline, 25% being split for it and 25% being normal. Plus about 25% or 50% of your female chicks will also be Opaline I believe. The percentages aren't exact, I can't remember what they are exactly, but that is an average of what you'll get.
 

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YF2 violet sky blue split recessive pied and opaline **** X violet grey opaline hen split for recessive pied.

I'll do the mutation percentages seperate, if you want to work out the odds of a single chick being a certain combination, just multiply the seperate mutations (eg 50% male x 50% sky blue x 50% yellow face type 2 = 12.5% or one in 8 chicks).

50% male, 50% female
50% sky blue, 50 % light grey
50% normal, 50% YF2
25% normal, 50% split for recessive pied, 25% recessive pied
25% normal, 50% SF violet, 25% DF violet
25% males split opaline, 25% opaline males, 25% normal female, 25% opaline female

So to get a male YF2 recessive pied opaline DF violet sky blue you are looking at: 50% x 50% x 25% x 25% x 25% x 50% = 0.1953125% or 1 in 512 chicks. (Which is the most unlikely combination). If the gender doesnt matter, your chances double to 1 in 256 chicks.

But then these are just mathematical odds, and that may very well be the first chick that hatches. Just a possibility is all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Willow is actually Storm's son. I know just about everyone here doesn't agree with inbreeding but I have never had a problem with it. I also would like to know what color mutations both are carrying. Neither bird has any health problems so everything should go just fine.
 

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I don't disagree with pairing related birds if it is done for a good reason and the relationship is not too close but I think that deliberately breeding a mother and son together is totally irresponsible.
 

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I don't disagree with pairing related birds if it is done for a good reason and the relationship is not too close but I think that deliberately breeding a mother and son together is totally irresponsible.
I agree with nev!
 

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As i mentioned on you're "is inbreeding bad?" thread - it is usually done to fix top show traits and create a line/family of birds all possessing those top traits. It is done with strict record keeping and very selective pairing, and even then parent to child is a very very rare pairing.
 
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