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Is it the same as being "Split to" a mutation? I know that being split to means a mutation a budgie does not show visually but carries the gene for a mutation it doesn't show.

As in Phenotype will be the result of the presence of a Dominant gene, but the genotype will contain the dominant and the recessives?
 

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I think masking is used more when talking about inos and df spangles as you will get solid colored birds. For example, when you can have a solid white DF spangle from two SF spangle parents who may also be grey factored or cinnamon or opaline. The DF spangle masks the other genetics. Where as split to means just what you said. You can have a green bird from a green parent and a blue parent and that bird would be split to blue, ,meaning if it were paired with a blue mate, they could produce blue offspring. So, if my understanding is correct, they're slightly different in meaning.
 

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I'm pretty sure the term 'masking' is only used to describe INOs and DF spangles, anything that hides markings. For example, if you had a pair of budgies, and the father was opaline, and the mother was INO, and they had visually opaine chicks that were male, you would know that she was making opaline, because hens can't be split for opaline, or any of the other sex linked mutations.
Hope this helps:)
 

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Masking is when a bird is two or more mutations at the same time but one mutation can't be seen because it is being masked by the other mutation.

For example if you pair an opaline **** bird that is split for ino to to an opaline hen any female ino chicks that are born will be masking opaline because all the chicks from a pair of opalines will be opaline but if they are also ino it won't be visible.
 

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So masking describes a trait that should be seen in the bird, except it's not because of another mutation that hides it (like pied or ino).

Split means that the bird has a recessive copy of a gene. It wouldn't be seen anyway.

Right?
 
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