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it's about the glow of the birds plumage in a certain light. I would describe it as fluorescent. I've attached two photos, one of Winter the albino and the other who is Toby the green budgie.

This photo is Winter the albino. Now visually she is white. But the camera catches the blue suffusion because of the flash. I could have done better. :(



It's not as obvious with Toby. This one is of Toby that shows a slight green suffusion on his underside.



Hope that helps!
 

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Dont be confused between suffusion and fluorescence. Fluorescence is the blue sheen seen on green budgies and blue based white albinos. Suffusion is colour coming through or 'suffising' into areas where it normally shouldnt. The opaline gene allows body colour to suffuse through wings and back/shoulders on a budgie. But sometimes opaline bred normals or even opalines have body colour 'suffusing' up their necks and heads which is considered a fault (although its rather common).

Double factor spangles in the early days commonly had a suffused bib of colour on their chest, almost the reverse of the recessive pieds we see today. This is now considered a fault sadly and is avoided. I think its a shame since dark eyed clears and double factor spangles are identical, so i think double factor spangles should have had the suffused chest bib included as a way to seperate the breed because i think it looks gorgeous.
 

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Well I stand corrected. ;)

My understanding was based on a budgie contest on another site and my budgie was disqualified because of what was described to me as a green suffusion in a lutino. The judge has 50 years as a breeder and a judge so I thought he'd know.
 

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Well I stand corrected. ;)

My understanding was based on a budgie contest on another site and my budgie was disqualified because of what was described to me as a green suffusion in a lutino. The judge has 50 years as a breeder and a judge so I thought he'd know.
That is correct. A lutino showing green would be classed as having green suffusion - colour where it should not be. Lutinos should be pure yellow, so having green is classified as colour suffusion. E.g Colour has 'suffused' through to an area where it should not be. Had this same bird been an albino instead of a lutino, the colour suffusing through would have been blue and still classified as suffusion.

Another word for suffusion is 'permeation' which means: the process of permeating or infusing something with a substance

The examples i gave above for greens having blue irridescence (fluorescence) and albinos having blue suffusion are just examples, there are a number of varieties and types of colour that classify as suffusion. I just intended to clarify the terms.
 

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That is correct. A lutino showing green would be classed as having green suffusion - colour where it should not be. Lutinos should be pure yellow, so having green is classified as colour suffusion. E.g Colour has 'suffused' through to an area where it should not be. Had this same bird been an albino instead of a lutino, the colour suffusing through would have been blue and still classified as suffusion.

Another word for suffusion is 'permeation' which means: the process of permeating or infusing something with a substance

The examples i gave above for greens having blue irridescence (fluorescence) and albinos having blue suffusion are just examples, there are a number of varieties and types of colour that classify as suffusion. I just intended to clarify the terms.
I think I am more clear now! Thank you. So I guess my albino Winter, pictured in my previous post above, has a very bad blue suffusion? I wanted her to be white but she had that blue in her. I had trouble getting really good photos because of that. And she was my favorite. :(

Also a question: If a green bird is split for blue, would it have a blue suffusion?
 

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I've heard that about green birds split blue, but i havent seen it myself. All green birds have areas with blue flushing - especially around the vent/rump and often around the neck/shoulders.

Might be worth looking into further.
 

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Dont be confused between suffusion and fluorescence. Fluorescence is the blue sheen seen on green budgies and blue based white albinos. Suffusion is colour coming through or 'suffising' into areas where it normally shouldnt. The opaline gene allows body colour to suffuse through wings and back/shoulders on a budgie. But sometimes opaline bred normals or even opalines have body colour 'suffusing' up their necks and heads which is considered a fault (although its rather common).

Double factor spangles in the early days commonly had a suffused bib of colour on their chest, almost the reverse of the recessive pieds we see today. This is now considered a fault sadly and is avoided. I think its a shame since dark eyed clears and double factor spangles are identical, so i think double factor spangles should have had the suffused chest bib included as a way to seperate the breed because i think it looks gorgeous.
ohh okay ;)
 

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I'm guessing suffusion is only considered a fault if you are entering your bird in competitions?

My budgie Honey is very nearly white but she does show up light yellow under certain lighting conditions. Would that be suffusion, fluorescence, or neither?

Here she is in two different pictures, looking yellow, and then white. Her head is the only thing that is yellow all the time.





Is this suffusion? Is it a fault?

Not that I worry about it; I think she is lovely. :D
 

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I'm guessing suffusion is only considered a fault if you are entering your bird in competitions?

My budgie Honey is very nearly white but she does show up light yellow under certain lighting conditions. Would that be suffusion, fluorescence, or neither?

Here she is in two different pictures, looking yellow, and then white. Her head is the only thing that is yellow all the time.





Is this suffusion? Is it a fault?

Not that I worry about it; I think she is lovely. :D
Shes looks like a yf2 Albino..just like Banana



 

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Eternal Love
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I'm guessing suffusion is only considered a fault if you are entering your bird in competitions?

My budgie Honey is very nearly white but she does show up light yellow under certain lighting conditions. Would that be suffusion, fluorescence, or neither?

Here she is in two different pictures, looking yellow, and then white. Her head is the only thing that is yellow all the time.





Is this suffusion? Is it a fault?

Not that I worry about it; I think she is lovely. :D
nope not a fault. She is whats called a cremino
 

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The yellow coming through is from the yellowface mutation. Normally its very visible, so if its only visible in certain light on your bird perhaps it is also masking a dilution mutation or perhaps the yellowface isnt expressing strongly.

Blue based albinos always have blue irridescence that appears in certain lightings or when you look at the bird from a certain angle. This is normal, but they try to avoid it in show breeding, so they use the grey factor in the albinos. They still look albino, but since the albino is masking grey instead of blue, you dont see the blue irridescence coming through.

I wouldn't worry about whether its a show fault or anything like that lol. Calling it a show fault doesnt mean anything except that it doesnt conform to 'standards' set by the society, it has nothing to do with the fact that a lot of birds with suffusion are gorgeous in every way!
 

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I believe this budgie is a dark eyed clear. Creamino has red plum eyes but I saw black eyes here.

Can someone explain the difference between dark eyed clear and double factor spangle ?
Red eyes dont always show up as red in pictures. I have albinos that show up with black eyes in pictures depending on the lighting.

Dark eyed clears are reasonably rare because those that know how to combine the mutations necessary are generally show breeders, and show breeders cant be bothered with a lot of recessive varieties as they are more difficult to breed up to show standards. Its very uncommon to see them, although i know of a breeder in australia on another budgie board who is trying to breed some up to show standard. They are more common as pet types.

They are a combination of recessive pied and clearflight pied and as such are distinguished by their orange beaks, lack of irises, and in the males the pinky purple cere.

Double factor spangles are just that - double factor spangles. A double dose of the spangle gene somehow wipes out the colouring pigments creating a white or yellow bird. They have normal beaks and ceres, and often have suffusion on the chest almost in a wide rough love heart shape.
 

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Her eyes are black though. Both my birds have all black eyes with no irises.
 
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