Talk Budgies Forums banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The male has been bred before he is a opaline spangle. all females produced were opaline.

The female Is a yellowface spangle but I am unsure if she is a mauve or a grey.

I expect to get various blue/grey spangles, with or without yellowfaces along with all white babies. if female all should be opaline. if male will be split opaline.
 

Attachments

·
Member of the Month
Joined
·
4,269 Posts
I don't know enough about genetics to help with your
question, but I will say that your birds are just beautiful!
Whatever babies they create will surely be lovely :)
 
G

·
Hi Angel226


I think you are wrong about the mutations of the pair.

From the picture shown,

1. **** is skyblue greywing ( no opaline and not a spangle)
2. Hen is golden face type2 cobalt spangle (no grey no mauve)

With no split mutations known in the pair, the following offsprings are expected,

- 50% spangle and 50% normal
- 50% skyblues and 50% cobalts
- 100% golden face type1
- 100% split for greywings

Good luck in your breeding. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I do know that the **** is defiantly split opaline to say the least all females he produced were opaline and he is for sure spangle as he produced this chick (df spangle) with a green opaline spangle hen. unless you think the chick is a luntino if that's the case he's split ino but it would make no sense that the chick is male as the hen was not ino, I do agree that he is a grey wing. but I also believe he is spangle and opaline,
it's either coincidence he produced all opaline chicks with being split to opaline or he is just a poorly marked opaline spangle.

as for the hen thanks as I had no idea what to classify her as.
 

Attachments

G

·
This chick shown is a female and not a male. She should have red eyes for a lutino chick. Other than this, the hen could had multiple mates prior to breeding this pair you had shown in 1st post.

One can't go wrong with punnet squares theory.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
really? I'm pretty sure it is a male df spangle. ill take another picture as I did keep him. as for mutation you are agreeing with me that the chick is a df spangle? if that's the case I do not have any other spangle males other than the one in question. my other spangles are both female. the one I am pairing the male in question to And my green opaline spangle female that he was paired to previously to produce the df spangle yellow chick posted. so even if she did happen to mate with a different male before i separated her into a different cage my other males would only be able to produce inos. Ill try to get a picture of the males back also. and of my other opaline spangle female.

the hen shown at the start of the post is the one I am pairing him to now. it is not the same hen who produced the df spangle chick but it is the same male to be used.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
the male in question. grey wing spangle. either split or is opaline
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
opaline spangle female he was paired previously to to produce the df spangle.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
other chick produced by green opaline spangle and male in question. which shows he is at least split opaline.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
another chick produced by them opaline spangle dilute female.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
then another chick produced by the opaline spangle hen and male in question.
they produced 2 df spangles which was the first chick and the last chick to hatch. there were 5 chicks in total. all produced by the male in question and the green opaline spangle hen which from the chicks produced is split blue and grey wing.
 

Attachments

G

·
The father looked like a spangle, alright. I doubt he can have 3 alleles for a spangle greywing. As far as I know, 1 budgie can have 2 alleles only. 1 allele contributes by each parent to give 2 alleles to an offspring.

If the father is indeed a spangle, then the offsprings are double factor spangles from a spangle mother and a spangle father. A 25% probability.

When are you going to breed this father again ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
this male is the one I am putting together with the hen who is what you called a golden face type 2 cobolt spangle. the chicks I posted here he produced with the opaline spangle hen.

I do know that they have 2 alleles one from each parent but as far as I know they can have multiple genes on the one allele which could allow it to have both the spangle and grey wing gene.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
322 Posts
this male is the one I am putting together with the hen who is what you called a golden face type 2 cobolt spangle. the chicks I posted here he produced with the opaline spangle hen.

I do know that they have 2 alleles one from each parent but as far as I know they can have multiple genes on the one allele which could allow it to have both the spangle and grey wing gene.
This chick shown is a female and not a male. She should have red eyes for a lutino chick. Other than this, the hen could had multiple mates prior to breeding this pair you had shown in 1st post.

One can't go wrong with punnet squares theory.
@ Angel. Your male is definitely a sky blue opaline spangle. No doubt about it. On my computer screen, it even looks like he has a bit of yellow on his face, perhaps a creamface (also known as a yellow face type I). Your female is harder to tell but she seems to be a mauve or cobalt goldenface spangle. Just to let you know, there are multiple alleles on a gene, not multiple genes on an allele. :p But yes, it's possible your male could be a greywing spangle.

@Jimm, the chick shown is definitely a male and it should not have red eyes as it is not a lutino but a double factor spangle! It's true, one can't go wrong with Punnett squares, but you can go wrong with identifying mutations. If the mutations you calculate are wrong, your results will be wrong as well!

If the female is mauve, the chicks will be
12.5% cobalt goldenface DF spangle male split for opaline
12.5% cobalt goldenface spangle male split for opaline
12.5% cobalt goldenface DF opaline spangle female
12.5% cobalt goldenface opaline spangle female
12.5% cobalt goldenface spangle male split for opaline
12.5% cobalt goldenface male split for opaline
12.5% cobalt goldenface opaline spangle female
12.5% cobalt goldenface opaline female

If the female is cobalt, half the offspring will be sky blue while the other half will be cobalt.
I hope I helped, good luck! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
thanks!! you helped quite a bit. and thanks for agreeing with me about the chick I was thinking my eyes were failing me if the chick was indeed female!

haha and oops my bad about the allele and gene mix up.i knew it was something along those lines. :)

I also think that the hen is a mauve color as she looks darker in person than she does in the picture. the male on the other hand just has a yellow face from rubbing on a yellow mineral block after having a bath lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
322 Posts
thanks!! you helped quite a bit. and thanks for agreeing with me about the chick I was thinking my eyes were failing me if the chick was indeed female!

haha and oops my bad about the allele and gene mix up.i knew it was something along those lines. :)

I also think that the hen is a mauve color as she looks darker in person than she does in the picture. the male on the other hand just has a yellow face from rubbing on a yellow mineral block after having a bath lol.
Yes, I agree, your hen looked too dark to be a cobalt. That's why I only wrote out the mutation results for her being mauve instead of cobalt. :)
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top